What are my options for fixing this chewed up drip irrigation setup?

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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 15:29:47 -0700, Guv Bob wrote:

Thanks for noticing. It's usually only Oren who appreciates the softer, more artistic side of my OCD personality :)
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 16:42:24 -0700, Oren wrote:

Wow. Nice job! I did miss that. I don't know what "seasoning" is (I'll have to look up the thread); but wow. It looks great! (And it started off looking horrid.)
I like the way you assembled the photos (with the white border).
Did you use Paint.NET freeware on Windows for the DIY photo?
PS: I'm a Windows/Linux freeware junkie; have been a freeware addict for decades; so, I pretty much should know most of the good stuff. The only thing you ever need to buy is MS Office; and even then, only to be 100% compatible with the proletariat who use Windows exclusively. :)
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 15:35:09 -0700, Oren wrote:

I will put all new "stuff" on there, as that's the only way I'll know how it is put together anyway.
What I *think* I'll do is replicate what "was" on the other elbow (of the other nearby tomato plot), which is a MHT garden-hose fitting (which had a soaker hose on it until the wife ripped it off in the mistaken believe that I put it there and that it was a thread, somehow, to the baby tomato plants):

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On Tuesday, June 25, 2013 1:55:00 AM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

ww5.picturepush.com/photo/a/13403753/img/13403753.jpg So I figured I'd repl ace it with something better. But what? One end is merely bent over and nai led to these boards: http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/13403755/img/13403 755.jpg And, the other end has this cryptic glued? connection: http://www1. picturepush.com/photo/a/13403754/img/13403754.jpg I've never worked on drip irrigation before, so I picked up all sorts of 3/4" connections at the box stores:
At H ome Depot, the guy told me that it's normal for the drip lines to simply pu sh in, but this end seems to be really really stuck. Another elbow nearby h as a NPT-to-Hose fitting on the end: http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/13 403769/img/13403769.jpg Would you suggest I simply cut the elbow off and st art fresh by putting a garden-hose connection on a T fitting? Note: The pla nts are tomatoes, which are just now sprouting, so it has to be a gentle ir rigation. I think a soaker hose may be too heavy - but I'm not sure what my options are.
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On Tuesday, June 25, 2013 1:55:00 AM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

ww5.picturepush.com/photo/a/13403753/img/13403753.jpg So I figured I'd repl ace it with something better. But what? One end is merely bent over and nai led to these boards: http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/13403755/img/13403 755.jpg And, the other end has this cryptic glued? connection: http://www1. picturepush.com/photo/a/13403754/img/13403754.jpg I've never worked on drip irrigation before, so I picked up all sorts of 3/4" connections at the box stores:
At H ome Depot, the guy told me that it's normal for the drip lines to simply pu sh in, but this end seems to be really really stuck. Another elbow nearby h as a NPT-to-Hose fitting on the end: http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/13 403769/img/13403769.jpg Would you suggest I simply cut the elbow off and st art fresh by putting a garden-hose connection on a T fitting? Note: The pla nts are tomatoes, which are just now sprouting, so it has to be a gentle ir rigation. I think a soaker hose may be too heavy - but I'm not sure what my options are.
Your photo showing "oak sprouts" doesn't look anything like I would have ex pected to see if it were showing real oak sprouts. What makes you think th e plants are oak sprouts??? Tomatoes like a good soaking of the soil about every 4 -5 days, and the more sun the better. At least half a day of suns hine.
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 18:48:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Hmmm... they're under an oak tree (which bears acorns). And, they "look" like the same leaves. But, that's all I had to go by.

Having seen the majestic deeply lobate oaks of the east coast, I do understand the leaf does not look like your common eastern oaks ... but I still "think" it's an oak (due to the fact that the momma bears acorns - and I don't know any other tree that does that but an oak).
If it's not an oak, what is it?
Googling ... I see this Coast Live Oak: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_agrifolia
Or, maybe this Blue Oak: http://www.hastingsreserve.org/oakstory/TreeOaks.html
And, these common-to-California oaks: http://www.laspilitas.com/groups/oaks/california_oak1.html
And, even these native California oaks: http://www.stevenkharper.com/oakofcalifornia.html
Almost none of which have the classic East-Coast lobate leaf shape.
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 20:16:15 -0700, Oren wrote:

Oren knows his huckleberries!
They were directly under a big evergreen oak. Actually, they were under a big evergreen thing that produced acorns. And, I think acorns are only made by oaks. Right?
Besides, the leaves don't look much different than this: http://www.fourdir.com/p_coast_live_oak.htm
And, the branches are kind of gnarly like this: http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/quercus-agrifolia
So, I "think" it's an evergreen red oak species.
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On Tuesday, June 25, 2013 1:55:00 AM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

ww5.picturepush.com/photo/a/13403753/img/13403753.jpg So I figured I'd repl ace it with something better. But what? One end is merely bent over and nai led to these boards: http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/13403755/img/13403 755.jpg And, the other end has this cryptic glued? connection: http://www1. picturepush.com/photo/a/13403754/img/13403754.jpg I've never worked on drip irrigation before, so I picked up all sorts of 3/4" connections at the box stores:
At H ome Depot, the guy told me that it's normal for the drip lines to simply pu sh in, but this end seems to be really really stuck. Another elbow nearby h as a NPT-to-Hose fitting on the end: http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/13 403769/img/13403769.jpg Would you suggest I simply cut the elbow off and st art fresh by putting a garden-hose connection on a T fitting? Note: The pla nts are tomatoes, which are just now sprouting, so it has to be a gentle ir rigation. I think a soaker hose may be too heavy - but I'm not sure what my options are.
27 foot above the ground pool is a damn deep pool, or did you mean 27 foot diameter, if so, how deep/tall was it????
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