Weed Killer

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Saw a post a while ago about making weed killer using vinegar and something else. Cannot find the post now. Can someone repost the formula?
Thanks,
R
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wrote:

I posted this video awhile ago. It mentions using _heated_ vinegar and salt. Heating the vinegar helps the salt dissolve easily and then sprayed on weeds in driveways and sidewalks.

http://www.youtube.com/UNRExtension

Came from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension.
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Oren wrote:

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You may have been talking about 1 pint (20% garden vinegar) and 2 tbls citrus oil but try the heated method too. I'm still having trouble with certain types of weeds. I'm going to look into Oren's link next time.
Jim
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I read the post, using vinegar and citrus oil.
Using salt, instead the formula would be:
One glass of vinegar, heated.
4 tbls of salt added, stirred to dissolve the salt.
A bottle sprayer is then used to spray the weeds.
I've not tried either method, yet. My neighbor was spraying his front rock landscape recently with Roundup. I'll try the heated vinegar and salt to try and kill some weeds he missed. Just for giggles.
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Oren wrote: ...

Just remember to not use something like this where expect to have any other cover any time. In a rock area, patio, sidewalk cracks, etc., it'll be ok but don't use it to spot stuff in the yard, for example. The salt will be a real problem in that case for quite a long time.
--
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"ROANIN" wrote

I just use the cheap white or pale golden stuff sold by the gallon at the food store. Use straight. Another adds salt which seems harmless.
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Can anyone say how effective this is?
It sounds perfect for "flooding" my patio pavers so it goes deep between them without leaving a toxic residue soaking into the brick. There is a restaurant supply here that has great prices on vinegar. It will clean the pavers too if I use it as an acid wash and get killer down between the pavers at the same time while scrubbing. Please post how effective it is as a weed kill. I suppose muratic acid will work too but that is really harsh.
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On Tue, 28 Sep 2010 12:24:59 -0700 (PDT), RickH

Roundup kills the ROOTS so the weeds go down and STAY down. Vinegar is a very temporary measure.
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On Sep 28, 2:29pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

But I dont want roundup soaked into the brick as a residue.
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RickH wrote the following:

Are you planning to plant some flowers or vegetables between the patio bricks? FWIW, I dump the muriatic acid used to clean the pool's DE filters fingers on the patio after I close the pool for the season. The freakin' moss and weeds still comes up between the bricks the next year. I also spray the patio with roundup in the early spring. I spend a lot of money trying to get grass to grow in my clay filled lawn, but a few grains of windblown dirt on my patio is enough to support a sprout of grass between the blocks. Go figure! In case you are wondering, this patio was built using more than the appropriate underlayments. The trenches were over excavated, much to the dismay of the contractor who had to use more gravel and sand than usual for the contracted price.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

You can plant flowers and most vegetables 48 hours after apllication of roundup. It is designed to do its thing to existing roots and then break down rapidly. It doesn't linger in the soil.
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On Sep 29, 7:15am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

This is not soil, it is pavers soaking up a herbicide where we sit as outside living space, that is waht is un-appealing. Vinegar and salt is harmless if pavers soak that up and people walk on it barefooted.
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There is a replacement for triox that I've seen in lowes. Your vinegar/salt is probably ok for what you are trying to do. Are your trees all reasonably far away? I'd don't know how environmentally friendly it is but I have also seen discussions about wiping the pavers down with used motor oil. Apparently also leaves a nice patina.
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Roundup breaks down in a very short time. There is *nothing* dangerous about it "soaking into the pavers". Don't get that vinegar and salt in a cut on your feet! :-/
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Roundup breaks down in a very short time. There is *nothing* dangerous about it "soaking into the pavers". Don't get that vinegar and salt in a cut on your feet! :-/
========================== Glyphosate needs certain soil particles to bind with, then the soil's microbes break it down. Lacking that, it can remain active for some time.
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The pavers are going to contain the same microbes. Some time = days, tops.
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The pavers are going to contain the same microbes. Some time = days, tops.
===========================Pavers can't sustain a soil microbe population, any that might be present would just be whatever few are tracked on your feet. All the while, the Roundup's being tracked indoors & elsewhere. Some people have found glyphosate on things after 90 days of being sprayed. http://www.rainforestinfo.org.au/good_wood/tox_herb.htm
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== I dislike Monsanto but its RoundUp when it came out was a godsend for agriculture. Properly diluted for spraying the solution will break down readily and any traces of it found "tracked in" will be practically benign. I have used it for grass control for twenty years. ==
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=I dislike Monsanto but its RoundUp when it came out was a godsend for agriculture. Properly diluted for spraying the solution will break down readily and any traces of it found "tracked in" will be practically benign. I have used it for grass control for twenty years. = The glyphosate might break down depending where it ends up, and I'm not sure I like what it breaks down into. The inert ingredients aren't so biodegradable, and negative synergistic effects have been found between the glyphosate and the surfactant in it even at normal dilution rates.
Ah well, Monsanto's deceit and its product have long since been thrashed to death in rec.gardens, so I won't argue it further. If someone uses the stuff in their line of work I can understand how they might've come to rely on it. But while still not a lasting solution, in a case like the OP's a blowtorch might be better.
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