Waterproof glue

Need some waterproof glue for a small project out of treated wood, Plexiglas, and ceramic that will be underwater. Epoxy seems to only last 6 months to a year before it looses its grip. Anything better? I don't need much.
Dan
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Maybe this: http://www.drillspot.com/products/374978/3M_FC_5200_Marine_Adhesive_Sealant
I would think you probably need to use a mechanical fastner like SS screws.
Another thing to try might be increasing the surface area glued by using lap joints or even a glue joint if possible.
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Titebond 3 is waterproof;a wood glue.
if epoxy is losing it's grip,then you're not getting enough penetration into the wood,a problem with treated wood. Perhaps a thin boat-building epoxy like West,System Three(try their trial kit),or RAKA would work better.Those you coat the wood with the thin epoxy first,then use fillers to turn the thin stuff into a thicker glue.
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Jim Yanik
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Read the fine print. While it meets the "waterproof" rating, it is not suitable for submersion.
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wrote in message

yes,you're right.
submersing WOOD is not a good idea in the first place.
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Epoxy is a filler. If you want something to be held by epoxy, you have to make a form and have the epoxy surround both objects.
You'd do better to use screws/clamps/etc. What are the shapes involved?
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On Mon, 09 Mar 2009 09:47:26 -0500, AZ Nomad

???
Epoxy is a very tenacious glue for many materials. It is not a filler until you add other materials to it to make it a filler. In fact, when using it to glue porus materials such as wood, you need to add filler for it to adhere properly.
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Submerged wood?
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wrote:

I thought it was dumb too, but people even put boats in the water.
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wrote:

yes,but wood swells when wet,so it closes up gaps in the joinery. ;-) My dad preferred wood boats,as he could take out a damaged piece,bolt in a new one,and refinish it. Some woods like Cypress are naturally water-resistant. ISTR there's some place in the US where they recover old trees that became waterlogged and sank to the lake bottom,and they mill it and it's still better wood than what's logged today.
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on 3/10/2009 8:43 AM (ET) Jim Yanik wrote the following:

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Dan Kuechle wrote:

Not sure but you might check Gorilla Glue. I know you use water to make it adhere
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wrote:

JBWeld. If you use SS fasteners, all the better.
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