Water Shutoffs: Knob vs Lever

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My kitchen sink is at the end of the water supply run. Bath tub comes first, then bathroom sink, and finally, the kitchen. The water pressure in the bathroom is fine, but it's bordering on anemic at the kitchen faucet. It's a brand new Moen, and the same problem existed before I installed the faucet. I wonder if the reason is that in the supply line, after the bathroom but before the kitchen, there are shutoffs - the lever type that you turn 90 degrees to operate. Does that type have any sort of bad reputation for messing with pressure, as compared to the knob type that requires several revolutions to open or close?
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OK. Thinking just of the cold water for the moment, the supply line is a straight run from the meter to the kitchen, with branches picked off about 20 feet back for the bathroom. It takes a 90 degree bend upward to the kitchen sink one floor above. When I replaced the faucet, I also replaced the flexible supply lines because they looked worn, but the problem remains. What's your next guess?
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Doug Kanter wrote:

Can the shutoff be taken apart? If so I would pull out the stem and take a look at it.
You could do a test at that point too. Someone hold a pail under it while turning on the water supply. I would really expect the lever type to give better flow but there could be something stuck inside.
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More than likely the water lines in the home are to small. The only unpractical solution is to replace all the water lines and fittings to larger sizes. This is the problems in most new homes, more economy, cheaper construction.
Master Ground Water Contractor Porky Cutter
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What's the right size pipe, if I lost my mind one day and starting attacking my pipes because I had nothing better to do at the moment?
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A minimum of 1/2" but personally I like 3/4" lines. Usually the line coming in from the meter is 1" to 1-1/4". Why does the builder install 3/8" (or smaller lines) in the home. Because it's cheaper.
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Porky Cutter, MGWC
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But, the pressure's fine in the bathroom. The next stop is the kitchen, which is just 18 feet more pipe, in terms of distance. And, my outside hose faucet has loads of pressure, and the longest pipe run (from the meter). All the same size pipe.
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Abe wrote:

It is true that the type of valve has no bearing on the water pressure, however it does have a bearing on flow rate which most people perceive as pressure.
The ball valve type (1/4 turn lever, or some new knob types) provide a straight through flow path that provides far less flow resistance than the multi turn knob type where the water has to take typically two 90 degree turns. In short the 1/4 turn ball valve type are superior to the multi turn type.
Pete C.
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Didn't you just say 1 floor above? Perhaps that is the issue, if your pressure at meter/ regulator is very low. If it's ok, I guess I'd agree that you may have obstruction in flow.
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pressure. That is why the flow rate is lower. People's preceptions are accurate here.

valve is probably inferior.
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All I know is that if I stick a watering can under that faucet, it takes twice as long to fill up, compared to using any other faucet in the house. :-)
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I'd suspect that there might be a flow limiting washer on the faucet. I've seem them just above the aerator, a metal washer with a small hole in it, that limits how fast water can come out. I throw them away. I like to be the one that controls the flow of water, not some pencil necked geek in a government office regulating what faucet manufacturers must add to their products.
Lena
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Doug Kanter wrote:

long will it take to fill the can? This will eliminate the new fixture and start locating the trouble. Could be there's a restriction in the water pipe between your bathroom and kitchen. If perhaps a upstream valve decided to come apart some time ago, a piece could be caught in a downstream elbow or at the shut off valve itself. How easy would it be to replace the shut off valve. Do you have the same flow rate problem with hot water too?
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The problem is about equal for hot & cold. And, you're right about replacing the shutoff valve. They're what...two bucks? I already own the soldering equipment. I may do that this weekend.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

there to turn it on or off, so you might as well get the maximum flow. You'll regulate the actual flow at the faucet. I'll just bet you find some blockage upstream of the valves, if not at the valve itself. IME, even the water company doing some repairs can introduce contaminates into the water supply, and its just your "bad luck."
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Solder a male 1/2" threaded nipple to the end or use a drop ear with a close nipple. Most valves come with 1/2" female threads so you can change in the future without soldering. Don't forget to flush the pipe while the valve is removed. If still slow, try probing with a bit of #14 copper wire
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Don't waste your time! Supply line is the problem. . .too small.
Porky Cutter, MGWC Master Ground Water Consultant snipped-for-privacy@cox.net
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And they don't leak like the knob ones do after being turned off and back on when they've been undisturbed for several years

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Half true.
Regardless of the amount of valve opening, Static pressure will be equal at both sides of the valve when no water is flowing.
While the water is running, the Dynamic water pressure will be reduced by the amount the valve is closed (impedance).
It's just like voltage across and current through a resistor.
Multi turn valves allow more control over dynamic pressure but have reliability issues with being turned all the way off. Ball valves (lever or knob) turn all the way off and on better but have less control in the middle
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