Water line replacement

Any input would be appreciated, especially on how long this job might take and what kind of connection would be at the water meter side.
Thanks.
I am working on a bid for replacing a water line from the house to the water meter.
62 feet
Require rental of "ditch witch", existing line is 3 feet deep
Owner says code requires only 18 inches deep with copper pipe
10 of those feet would require removal of stepping stones and small pieces of concrete
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Around these parts we use 1 inch typek copper tube 4 ft down this is scaled back to 1/2 at the meter. if not sure check your municipality.
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What'd be the point of having it 1/2" at the beginning? You might just as well run 1/2" all the way.
s

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You are not qualified to do the job. If you were, you'd not be asking code questions on a newsgroup. As for the depth, that will vary depending if you are in the cold north or temperate south. What the owner says is code has nothing to do with the real code. If you can't figure out how long it will take to trench it looking at the job, how do you expect us to do so?
Move on to things you know or get some experienced help so you can learn properly.
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If you can't say anthing positive, you should post.
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I did say something positive. I did post (but I think you meant to say "not" post).
IMO, it sounds like you are getting in over your head. The best advice I can give in a situation like this is to just STOP and not do it. We all have limits and judging by your questions, I think you have reached them. Please report back if you take on the job; we'd like to know how you make out.
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Raleigh_3_Speed wrote: ...

That existing 3-ft depth would make a lot more sense -- it better be an awfully warm winter climate for 18".
--
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Do you have a foundation it has to come in under it I think as Edwin was saying get a plunber as one there is more to it then sh-- flows downhill
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Thanks.
This is a drinking water line.
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HAving just had it done in June: 60 feet of 1 inch pex (blue plastic), new pressure tank, new fittings(brass), new power line to well. rough refill of holes (owner responsible for finished grade and reseeding of lawn). Took 2 guys 6 hrs. Could have been done faster but I specified minimal disturbance of landscaping. $3000. Northwest burbs of Chicago. OLd line was down about 3 ft. The guy said that it really needed to be a 4 ft.

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Thanks a lot for all the details. I was thinking around $4000 - $5000 for doing it myself using a trencher.
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It should be well under that. If all you are doing is replacing the line you are only looking at the cost of the pipe and rental on the ditch witch. I haven't done that work in many years but back then I would have estimated my cost at few hundred dollars. Of course if you contract it, that is a different story.
Question: Why are _you_ doing it? The owner is the one who should be taking care of it.
Harry K
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I gave a bid of $4000 dollars.
It's a fair bid because there are some pieces of concrete I will have to remove, plus work in the high heat and humidity.
Plus when you get into the job, you never know what you'll find.
I am a technical writer and chemical lab technician who is looking for work.
I have had my own business doing home remodeling and repair for about 5 years now. I enjoy the work, it's always interesting.
Customers can be cranky sometimes though. :-)
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Not all that difficult. You might be able to leave the stones and slab in place and use the old copper to pull the new through. The fitting is usually 3/4 npt going into the curb stop and 3/4 compression coming out ( assuming you are running soft copper 3/4" Go the full 36" you won't regret it, les liklihood of accidental damage or a freeze up in a hard winter.
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Thanks.
It's in Houston, not much chance of any long term freezes here, but will use full depth of trencher.
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Raleigh_3_Speed wrote:

Don't put it so deep it can't be found with a metal detector...
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