Vinyl sidiing?

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When installing siding, can you screw the vinyl slats to the house itself? Save time chasing them when the wind gets too severe.
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No.
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Yes. Read the instruction for the application of vinyl siding. They explain very clearly why you can't do that.
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On Sun, 04 Feb 2007 12:22:44 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@b.c wrote:

If you live in an area prone to violent wind storms then vinyl siding is a bad choice.
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Vinyl siding is a bad choice ANYWHERE
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Steve Barker


< snipped-for-privacy@b.c> wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...
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alt.home.repair:

Why?
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wrote in

Because it all look like plastic crap, that's why.
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Yes, some old cheap stuff certainly did, but many new types are difficult to tell from real wood at 10 years away.
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Assuming you meant 10 YARDS (not years), why should I be forced to stay 10 yards away from my own house for it to look good?
Call me a traditionalist (or a glutton for punishment :), but I just like the look and authenticity of wood clapboards, particularly on older houses. To my own prejudiced mind, vinyl will always be associated with the words "cheap" and "plastic".
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Lots of siding looks nice. Wood is fine but a pain in the ass to maintain over the years. Vinyl you put up and leave up. No rot. Virgin vinyl stays the same color without fading. If you spend the extra cash I rather have the real looking vinyl siding just because the stuff can last a lifetime!
Tom

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At 10 yards, chances are you can see the filled in spots and scraped and sanded wood too. Clapboard is nice when new but after a few paint jobs and peeling, it is a PITA. Paint as you wish, but I prefer not to.
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There is vinyl siding that looks good at 10 yards or 10 inches. I've had people touch my siding and still not believe that it was vinyl. It looks better than wood, never needs painting, does not chalk and won't break in a hail storm. We've only had one hail storm with golf ball sized hail. No damage to the siding.
Since the pieces are 2 ft by 4 ft there is no issue with wavyness either.
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Couldn't agree more. and I'm a modernist. Vinyl siding is cheap junk.
Maintenance free is a lie.
You have to wash it every year to get rid of the mildew and the chalking. And if you do that wrong, you end up with water in your wall's insulation. I've been looking at houses, and every single one that has vinyl siding that wasn't applied yesterday has all kinds of mildew and grime that collects in the poors and so on, and the agent says "oh you just have that washed every year or so"
If you buy the 'quality' stuff and you have your old siding prepped properly for installation of the new, And you are powerwashing it every year to avoid the grime and mildew, And you are replacing the siding every 10-20 years when it reaches the end of its life, And going through the hassle of finding someone to install it properly,
you may just as well have your wood siding scraped and repainted every 10-20 and continue it's indefinite lifespan.
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I'd agree if what you are saying was always true. My house is 27 years old and have never had mold on it. It has been washed with a hose every five years or so. Washed properly, the water will not get into the insulation. It gets washed less often than my painted garage.
As for its end of life, I'd at 27 years and expect it will go another 20+. Evidently, your experience has been much different than mine. Maybe you live in a rainy climate or a swamp, but here in the northeast, it is a rarity to have what problems you describe.
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a. Long runs of it expand more than the nail holes can tolerate, then it's all nice and wavy. b. It gets brittle c. hail (if running sideways) punches holes in it. d. It melts if your neighbors particle board palace burns down e. It chalks out and looks like shit f. It looks like a plastic lego house
Steel is the only way to go.
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Steve Barker



"Nil" <rednoise+ snipped-for-privacy@REMOVETHIScomcast.net> wrote in message
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Steve Barker wrote:

My vinyl siding is 23 years old. It has none of the failures that you describe although the neighbor's houses on either side of me have not burned down in all that time, but each is about 60 feet away and they are covered in asbestos siding. Ever see an asbestos siding house burn? Watch out for shrapnel!. Are you speaking from experience, or repeating some bullshit that someone else has said? What do you have on your house?

If your house catches fire, the vinyl will melt from the heat so that the fire hoses can get to the wood fire behind the steel.
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Bill
in Hamptonburgh, NY
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a. mine is steel b. I've seen hundreds of pictures, and all it takes is driving around and looking straight down the side of houses with vinyl. You'll get dizzy looking at the crooked bastards. (Also the seams are always nice also.) I never did figure out why they call it seamless with all those seams in it. c. if it's steel, all they'd have to do it keep it cool. No problem other than possibly blistering the paint. d. My closest neighbor is 1/2 mile away. If his house burns, I probably won't even know it. There's NO WAY I'd live any closer than that to someone.
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Steve Barker



"Willshak" < snipped-for-privacy@00hvc.rr.com> wrote in message
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Hell, I forgot. I have two with steel, and one with vinyl, and one that's still wood. The vinyl one will be steel as soon as we build on. The wood one is a rental and we'll just paint it.
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Steve Barker


"Willshak" < snipped-for-privacy@00hvc.rr.com> wrote in message
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