Using JB Weld on car gas line

I know JB Weld will fix most anything except some plastics and holds well on metals. I have heard it being used on gas tanks and never heard of it leaking after it was used. However, someone told me that modern gas will eat thru it. I dont see where modern gas is much different than the gas was 10 years ago. I guess most of it has some alcohol in it, but will alcohol hurt the JB Weld?
I have a 91 Chevy truck and there is a pin hole leak in a gas return line in the fuel pump outlet, right before it enters the hose. I'm not going to spend $250 to buy a new in-tank fuel pump (that's what I was quoted), when the pump works fine. I would have thought the JB Weld would be fine, but if not, I will have a guy solder it or braze it (after all the gas is flushed out by pumping water thru it). But the JB Weld is the easiest and cheapest method to fix it.
Also, these lines have a gas hose with some really weird fittings that need some special tool. The guy at the parts store told me I cant just use regular fuel hose and clamps because fuel injection engines have high pressure. How high can it be? I doubt it comes even close to the 100psi rating of the gasline hose, and if it does, I'll use air compressor hose rated at 300psi. At the same time, I had a guy who works on cars as a hobby tell me that he has used gasline hose for fuel injection lines. So, who is right? I tend to think that auto parts store guy wanted to get his grubby hands into my wallet with his $250 fuel pump, $20 special tool, and $28 special hose. $300 to fix a damn fuel line leak is insane (not to mention the hassle of removing the whole gas tank).
I hate working on these newer cars. Give me something prior to 1970 to work on, when things were still simple and parts were not sold by crooks.
Jimw
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Jimw wrote:

the jb will work. get it good and clean and dry and somewhat warm. Then let it cure a full 24 hours. Don't use the jb quick.
s
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What is fuel pump pressure, its probably low and a rubber piece spliced in with clamps will be just fine, the pressure rating on those hoses is im sure 5-10x what you have. I did it but needed 2 clamps on each side. Id try JB first but clean well with Laquer thinner and steel wool, alcohol and gas leave a residue. Braze it, that sounds crazy since rust caused your issue and you dont have much metal left. When my 91 Toy rusted a brake line out, within a year the fuel line was shot from salt. When the brake line went I hit another car, check yours, if they are all in the same location be carefull. JB even fixed my plastic radiator top section at 10f, 4 years ago. Why did it break, is the tank loose causing stress? Even my tank straps rusted away.
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some modern vehicles pressure is over a 100 pounds, my 1990 caravans normal pressure was over a 100 pounds, I found this out after putting a pressure gauge on mine and driving around.
it would dsrop low occasionally causing vehicle stumble.
replace the pump to avoid a nasty gas leak and possible fire, or patch line with proper high pressure hose.
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bob haller wrote:

he SAID it was a return line. in fact the OP's statement to that effect is STILL attached to this up above.
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wrote:

On injected cars there are usually 2 fuel pumps, a small one to get the gas out of the tank and a booster pump up on the engine to get the 100+PSI for the injectors.
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On Wed, 27 May 2009 11:07:39 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Have not seen that on any cars in North America for over 20 years.
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If the vehicle is carbureted, the pressure in the gas lines is much lower. Fuel injected, runs at a much higher pressure.
You mention a return line. Which is most likely rather low pressure. I'd try the JB weld. as the other writer mentions. The are needs to be clean and dry. And allow 24 hours for curing time befor using the vehicle.
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Before you take your truck out for a post repair road test, stop by NAPA. Autozone, Carquest or Pep Boys and buy a couple of the biggest fire extinguishers they make. Take a cell phone with you and plan your route to be within a mile of your local Fire Department. Try to stay away from public places where people could be endangered. Keep in mind that after the big conflagration, the FD will assign a cause to the blaze, thereby canceling your insurance. Of course, Finnegan's Law may not apply to you, in which case, best of luck. If you know someone really good with a welding torch, pros for years have repaired metal fuel lines with silver solder. Requires much less heat than braze, and has similar strength. You might even skip the fire extinguishers.
Joe
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the proper fuel injection clamps. They work, and although about double the cost of good regular fuel line and clamps, it will outlast them more than 3:1 on an EFI system. Don't even think about air hose - the fuel will destroy it in short order.
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There are several Fuel tank repair products that you could use that are made to be impervious to gasoline:
http://www.acehardware.com/family/index.jsp?categoryId=1258970&cp=1255100
http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=LCT-988638
http://www.itwconsumer.com/catalog.aspx?prodID=79
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On May 27, 11:17pm, snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

Stik can even be used on wet gasoline surfaces.
http://jbweld.net/products/jbstik.php
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