Underlayment Ring Shank Nails

Never used them before.
I'm prepping the floors in a 30+ year old house for carpet. A lot of the existing nails have worked loose and it creaks a lot. I've done a couple of rooms and it's good and tight.
It's been a PITA though and here's why.
When the carpet company came out to measure and size up hat had to be done I told them I will be pulling up the carpet and pad temporarily to refasten the flooring. Told them I would be using 8d coated sinkers to do so. Guy says using ring shank nails would be better. OK, guy is a pro, I asked for advice so I might as well take it.
So my plan is to renail with the coated 8d's near the the existing nails (totally removing any that are loose or popped) and use ring shanks in between which would half the spacing. Well those damn ring shanks ya barely tap them and if it ain't perfectly square contact they bend. The hammer is a new Estwing. They eyes, well they've got some wear & tear :-(
These RS nails are the underlayment type and thin if you ask me. Plus I'm going through subfloor into joists.
Is this just a lack of experience using underlayment RS nails?
Only having a roofing and finishing nailers, I had called Harbor Freight asking them if they had a nail gun that would shoot ring shank nails. I get "Hold on. Let me get someone on who is familiar with nail guns". I get 2nd person and ask same thing. Person hesitates and says "What exactly is a ring shank nail? Is it like a clipped head or something?" I'm like uhhh, nevermind, thanks.
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I'm in the process of doing the same thing now myself. How are your knees holding up?
I'm not using nails I'm using screws. I have a box of 2500 #8 x 2-1/2 that I got from McFeely's and I'm putting them about every 6". It might be a little overkill but I don't like these damn squeaks.
Good luck.
G.S.
wrote:

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Red Green wrote:

Somewhere in my tools I have a plastic nail holder. It's like pliers with groves to grip the nail shaft so you can get a nail started more easily without bending it or hitting your fingers. There are several different nail guides and holders that I've seen that may help you.
http://tinyurl.com/b7ttmw
http://tinyurl.com/dzs2qb
http://tinyurl.com/baqdkz
http://tinyurl.com/bx8384
http://tinyurl.com/csv66f
TDD
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They make ring shank nails that will work in a nail gun. What I would do is first source the nails you want to use and then if a good nailer is not in your budget, then consider renting one.
In my experience HF is a good place to buy some stuff but I think if I was going to buy a nail gun, I would first seek out a used name brand that you will nave no problems getting parts for and is likely to have a smooth consistent operation.
After doing my last roof with a nail gun, I would definitely consider one for a project of this type.
Goggle ring shank nails and stick with a name brand. getting some cheap Chinese off brand will probably not be worth the grief for the few bucks you save.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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On Tue, 3 Mar 2009 22:09:50 -0800, Roger Shoaf wrote:

Look for a nail gun with adjustable depth. My original framing nail gun adjusted the depth by air pressure. Not great. My roofing gun has adjustable depth. MUCH better!
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You can't get a better hammer.

Not really... I can empathize with your agony. My ancient joints limit activities, so I compensate with better tools. Makes my argument with SWMBO effective. The solution to your problem is to get a Senco framing nailer and use one their 3 sizes of ring shank nails. They are coated as well, and quite difficult to remove without a struggle. Used mine extensively on our current rehab project, for plywood sheathing, subflooring and roof decking. Keep in mind they do not draw down sprung boards like screws do, so by all means get an impact driver for that chore. If budgeting is a problem (the economy is crap we know), buy the nails and screws and rent the tools to be sure if you want to make the investment. Wear your safety glasses, hear?
Joe
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wrote:

Well, the one I replaced was an Estwing. Bought it around 1985. Guess it was time since the face can probably be considered a ball-peen lately :-)

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Decided to go at it again with a hammer today. Went quite well actually. Guess I just had to pay more attention to body positioning as well as learn the nails. Zipped through a 12x14 room...move furniture, pull up half of carper/pad, verify joist locations, nail, carpet/pad back, do same on other side then furniture back.
Never again without a nailgun. Considering the amount I had to do (all carpeted areas) I blew a perfect justification for one. Just wanted to get it done vs purchase research.
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6.168.3.70:

RG-
Could not find the description of the new hammer you bought.
I used to (YEARS ago) be able to drive 16's easily with a 24 oz smooth face but after an extended period of "not much hammer use".......I was no longer able to drive nails easily or consistently without bending. A guy I was working with said "why are you struggling with a smooth faced hammer, get yourself a milled face".
I switched to a 24 oz milled face & then to a 28 oz rigging axe. The milled face made a huge difference and I was back to driving nails easily, from any position or angle.
Give a decent sized (24 oz or bigger) milled face a try. Also, if the floor boards have any spring or gap to the joists, that will make driving more difficult.
I've got a Hitachi NR83A (FRH) that I hardly ever use now but I recommend them as well as Senco. A used unit would be a solid purchase.
cheers Bob
cheers Bob
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Oh yea. I have a milled face one. Long handle Estwing. Can do some serious driving with that on 16's. Can use in a pinch in place of a wrecking balade on a recip saw :-) Can put a hurtin' on my arm though if hammering above. Seriously doubt it would be any good on such low gague nails.
Thanks for the reply...
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replying to Red Green, stugotsa wrote: hi Red. i read your blog and it made me start to laugh of how the guy at harbor frieght didn't know what a rsn was. what the hell are they doing working in a constructio tool supply house. i know how you felt when you asked him about. the rsn and he didn't know what it was. im a 72 year old semi retired tile. contractor and i run into the same situation every time i ask a clerk at h ome depot, lowes etc. you think they would require their employees to go through. some sort of orientation and train them on the basic types of power gun fasteners, before they let them answer the phone to answer customers questions. and they want to raise minimum wage to $15.00 per hr.... in answer to your question about the rsn bending when using a hammer? it's all in the way how you're holding the hammer and making the right contact on the nail. i think a little practice will solve your problem. i hit the rsn lightly first to get it to bite in the wood, then it should not take more then two hits to get that nail down flush in the floor. just make sure that you let the weight of the hammer. do the work,with. wrist action ,not your arm, and in short time you will catch on. good luck.
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On Tuesday, March 3, 2009 at 9:53:00 PM UTC-6, Red Green wrote:

I hope after 6 years the guy has his new flooring options settled!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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