The Blitz gasoline can - what went wrong - what needs to be fixed

Page 3 of 4  
On 05/14/2013 07:39 AM, Danny D wrote:

ebay for "nato jerry can" and you'll have your solution.
--
fact check required

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 May 2013 17:26:06 -0700, jim beam wrote:

I love that thing! It's expensive; but it is designed and build like a brick outhouse!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/14/2013 08:26 PM, jim beam wrote:

For once, the Beam is 100% correct.
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/15/2013 08:26 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

how does my ass smell, brown nose?
--
fact check required

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 13 May 2013 23:21:29 +0000, Danny D wrote:

I have the same problem! There must be a puddling spot inside somewhere. This guy had a similar problem at point 6:45 of this video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lcnwdIYEfI

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 May 2013 01:35:34 +0000, Eddie Powalski wrote:

Another fix:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpaP-nT3Zog

And another:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3o5tHLWZKc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eddie Powalski wrote:

those videos are great. Later I am going to see if YouTube can teach me to tie my shoes again.....damn velcro....
GW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 May 2013 11:44:52 -1000, Geoff Welsh wrote:

Everything in those videos was intuitive to me except what to use for a vent. I thought it was ingenious that they drilled a half-inch hole (paddle wood bit would be better than the spiral flute bit they used though) and inserted an automotive tire valve sans the stem.
Pulling out the locking "trigger" was obvious, I agree.
Personally, I defeat the child-proof lock simply by knocking off the nub on the red plastic, whereas in the videos, they redundantly cut both the nub and the ratchet (either one would have worked alone).
That child-proof feature is odd though, because even with it removed, it's still darn difficult to get the cap off.
It's my opinion that any 'kid' strong enough to remove that cap is certainly already old enough to defeat the ratchet lock on his own anyway.
Overall, after experiencing these cans since their inception in California (which happened before you guys had the honor of following CARB regulations)... I've concluded the best thing to do with the spout is to simply remove it.
That's why I'm looking for caps to fit!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 May 2013 11:44:52 -1000, Geoff Welsh wrote:

Everything in those videos was intuitive to me except what to use for a vent. I thought it was ingenious that they drilled a half-inch hole (paddle wood bit would be better than the spiral flute bit they used though) and inserted an automotive tire valve sans the stem.
Pulling out the locking "trigger" was obvious, I agree.
Personally, I defeat the child-proof lock simply by knocking off the nub on the red plastic, whereas in the videos, they redundantly cut both the nub and the ratchet (either one would have worked alone).
That child-proof feature is odd though, because even with it removed, it's still darn difficult to get the cap off.
It's my opinion that any 'kid' strong enough to remove that cap is certainly already old enough to defeat the ratchet lock on his own anyway.
Overall, after experiencing these cans since their inception in California (which happened before you guys had the honor of following CARB regulations)... I've concluded the best thing to do with the spout is to simply remove it.
That's why I'm looking for caps to fit!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Danny D wrote:

The valve stem with the Schrader valve removed is an excellent modification...if they came like that they'd probably cost ten dollars more.
GW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 May 2013 11:44:52 -1000, Geoff Welsh wrote:

Everything in those videos was intuitive to me except what to use for a vent. I thought it was ingenious that they drilled a half-inch hole (paddle wood bit would be better than the spiral flute bit they used though) and inserted an automotive tire valve sans the stem.
Pulling out the locking "trigger" was obvious, I agree.
Personally, I defeat the child-proof lock simply by knocking off the nub on the red plastic, whereas in the videos, they redundantly cut both the nub and the ratchet (either one would have worked alone).
That child-proof feature is odd though, because even with it removed, it's still darn difficult to get the cap off.
It's my opinion that any 'kid' strong enough to remove that cap is certainly already old enough to defeat the ratchet lock on his own anyway.
Overall, after experiencing these cans since their inception in California (which happened before you guys had the honor of following CARB regulations)... I've concluded the best thing to do with the spout is to simply remove it.
That's why I'm looking for caps to fit!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 May 2013 22:47:45 +0000, Danny D. wrote:

Yikes. Sorry for the duplicate posts. AIOE keeps doing that! I don't know why.
Date: Tue, 14 May 2013 22:46:14 +0000 (UTC)
Date: Tue, 14 May 2013 22:46:44 +0000 (UTC)
Date: Tue, 14 May 2013 22:47:45 +0000 (UTC)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eddie Powalski wrote:

Really, really liked the hint of obtaining gas can vent caps via Ebay !
Cheap (1 for $3.00, 5 for $7.75, 10 for $11.20, 15 for $11.98, etc. ), trivial to install (1/2" bit is all you need), and quite functional.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 May 2013 17:48:30 -0500, HeyBub wrote:

I wonder how 'much' gas (percentage wise) actually escapes as vapor from a modified gas can with a vent?
That is, how much of a problem is the EPA trying to solve?
I'll call CARB tomorrow to see if I can nail down what we're saving in gas venting versus the huge frustration and cost of those useless spouts.
BTW: Sorry for the duplicate posts (AIOE does that every once in a while). (Using a different newsserver for this post).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/14/2013 07:28 PM, Danny D. wrote:

not to mention the increased spillage trying to get them to work...

--
fact check required

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 May 2013 19:33:30 -0700, jim beam wrote:

Seems to me they mandated the gas stays *in* rather well; but not that the gas comes *out* gracefully.
The cost of the complexity is (it seems): a) The increased spillage of gasoline b) The increased vapors from gas left in the can (see note 1) c) The increased cost & complexity of the spout d) The increased time it takes to pour the gas out
Note 1: I can't get all the gas out of the can with the spout on. I presume all that gas will vaporize and fill the can with gasoline vapors, which, will stay inside due to the lack of venting and permeability - but - they will immediately escape the moment the spout is removed for the refilling tasks.
Given that we spill more, and we vent more when we open the gasoline can to refill - yet - we certainly vent *less* during storage and during the pouring tasks ... I wonder where the balance of the equation lies?
Does anyone know of any data on what we're actually saving in vented gasoline vapors?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/14/2013 08:10 PM, Danny D. wrote:

for anything more than a few hours storage, there's no question that fully sealed will lose less. this is because the sealed can vapors will reach equilibrium and after initial vaporization inside the can, it will then stop once its magic vapor pressure is reached. with a vented can, that never happens, and it continues to leak out forever until all gone.
so, re storage, these cans are a win. but on pouring, which is the whole point of the can in the first place - most people use cans to transport gas, not store it - these "no leak" cans are a joke. maybe if you're filling a lawn mower they work, but for a car with the fuel cap only accessible from a vertical plane, it's pretty much impossible to pour more than about 30% of contents without spillage. and that's assuming you've /not/ given up on the spout and are not using a newspaper or other improvised funnel.
bottom line, these things need to be re-thought. preferably by someone with a car.
--
fact check required

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 14 May 2013 20:46:29 -0700, jim beam wrote:

Hmmm... in the olden days, with the vented cans, I don't remember ever having the gasoline all vaporize. Although, I must admit I never thought about the level in the can day to day.
Would the old-style cans lose *all* the gas over time?
How long (for 5 gallons)?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ill

l

n,

.

I used to store a 1 gal can in one of my sheds for the mowers. Never found the can empty even after sitting for a year.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course you didn't. If there is evaporation, the most volatile components go first. What remains evaporates more and more slowly.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.