Texas 85 mph - Don't work well with fog

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wrote:

You didn't read what I was responding to, did you??? it said - and I copy / paste the quote - " that's where the road is, and get out of your vehicle and further away, prefera".
Read before you respond.
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On Nov 26, 3:52pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not only did I read it, I WROTE it and I did not write what you just quoted. Don't beliee me, read the post you responded to.
YOu are grasping at straws trying to justify your advice that goes agains all the professionals.
Harry K
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wrote:

Harry - what advice have I given that goes against the advice of WHAT professionals?????
Here are just a few quotes and references that agree with me.
from http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety/winterdrive/winterdrive.shtml
Once in a skid, steer in the direction of the skid. To do this, look where you want your vehicle to go and steer toward that spot. Be careful not to oversteer. If you are on ice and skidding in a straight line, step on the clutch or shift to neutral.
and
What to Do in an EmergencyIf you get stuck or stranded, don’t panic. Stay with your vehicle for safety and warmth. Wait for help to arrive. If you are in an area with cell phone service and have a cell phone, call for help. Remember, dialing 911 on your cell phone will connect you with the emergency services contact centre in the area. Please use 1-888-310-1122 for non-emergencies.
Be careful if you have to get out of your vehicle when on the shoulder of a busy road. If possible, use the door away from traffic.
If you attempt to free your vehicle from the snow, be careful. Dress warmly, shovel slowly and do not overexert yourself. Do not attempt to shovel or push your vehicle if you have a medical condition. Body heat is retained when clothing is kept dry. Wet clothing, due to the weather or perspiration, can lead to a dangerous loss of body heat.
Draw attention to your vehicle. Use emergency flashers, flares, or a Call Police sign. Run your motor sparingly. Be careful of exhaust fumes. For fresh air, slightly open a window away from the wind. Exit your vehicle occasionally to make sure the exhaust pipe is clear of drifting snow before running the engine.
In blizzard conditions, especially overnight, make sure one person stays awake, because help could take some time to arrive. Maintain circulation by moving your feet, hands and arms
from http://www.purealpine.com/samoens/winter-driving /
What to do if you get trapped in snow Call the emergency services to let them know roughly where you are and your licence number. Always stay with your vehicle. In heavy snow it’s easy to get disoriented and separated from your car. Keep your car hazard lights on. Stay warm by running the engine. It’s vital to ensure that the exhaust pipe is not blocked by snow. If the engine fumes can’t escape, you could be overwhelmed by carbon monoxide gas which can kill. Even if it’s safe and the exhaust is clear, do not run the engine for more than 10 or 15 minutes in each hour.
from http://weather.about.com/od/winterweather/a/winter_survival.htm
In a Car or Truck
•Never leave the vehicle. If you are stranded, the vehicle offers a form of protection from overexposure to the cold. A single person walking through the snow is also harder to find than a stranded car or truck. •It is okay to run the car for short periods to provide some heat. Remember to crack the windows a small amount to allow for the circulation of fresh air. Dangerous exhaust fumes, including carbon monoxide, can build up very quickly. This is especially true if the tailpipe is buried in the snow. •Keep yourself moving. A car offers little room for you to keep your blood flowing, but exercise is a must. Clap your hands, stomp your feet, and move around as much as possible at least once an hour. In addition to keeping your body moving, keep your mind and spirit from wandering too far into gloom. While potentially dangerous situations are not a time of joy, keeping yourself from added stress will allow you to make smarter decisions when necessitated. •Make the car visible for a rescue. Hang bits of bright colored cloth or plastic from the windows. If the snow has stopped falling, open the hood of the car as a signal of distress
from http://www.handycanadian.com/articles-snow-storm-driving.asp
The following are tips on what to do if you are caught in your car during a bad snow storm:
•If your vehicle becomes immobilized, stay inside the vehicle until help arrives. Exceptions - to clear the exhaust pipe of ice and snow and prevent the possibility of carbon monoxide poisoning; or other precautionary measures that must be taken before returning to the safety of your car. •Tie a bright piece of cloth to the antenna to make your vehicle more visible. •If you have them, set flares; follow instructions. •Run your engine 10 to 15-minutes out of every hour for heat; crack a window for ventilation. •“Exercise;” move your arms, legs, fingers, and toes to keep your blood circulating.
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On Nov 27, 5:29pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Basically not to get off the road as far as possible.

Has zero to do with the discussion of what to do in bad visibility.
<snip> a whole bunch about what to do if one gets stuck - nothign at all to do with the thread.
And just what does getting stuck in snow have to to with getting OFF THE ROAD in heavy fog or other reduced visibility. The whole point of doing it is to avoid getting caught in one of theose multi vehicle pileups.
Harry K
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On 11-25-2012 23:19, Harry K wrote:

What are you _more_ likely to get in a blizzard if you get away from your vehicle?
--
Wes Groleau

“There ain't nothin' in this world that's worth being a snot over.”
  Click to see the full signature.
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WTF is sthat supposed to mean? Care to put it in a form that has some logic? And why is it necessary to 'get away from my vehicle" if I am well off the roadway?
I am repeating the same information you can find from professionals both instructors, and, ye, even cops.
Harry K
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wrote:

Around here you are always told to STAY WITH YOUR VEHICLE. If the vehicle gets hit you stand a chance. If you get hit outside the vehicle, you are DEAD. If you get lost in the blizzard, you are DEAD.
Stay in the car. Run the car occaisionally to provide some heat to prevent freezing to death. Keap the exhaust clear to avoid gassing yourself to death.
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2012 18:54:36 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

And try to stay gassed up. I fill up at half a tank in the winter.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

Here in W-NY we don't get that kind of fog very often. If I were driving in that fog, I'd be scared senseless: do I keep up with speeding traffic? Cuz if I slow down will I be hit? I'd probably watch the tailights in front of me (keep up with them) and pray. The couple killed and so many others hurt, I feel so bad for.
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On Nov 26, 3:54pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Kinda hard to run a car that has beens squashed. I have never seen anyone advise staying in a car on the highway in those multi car bashes. It is totally idiotic on the face of it.
Harry K
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wrote:

Harry - I wasn't talking about in an accident - but you are MANY TIMES safer in a car being hit than out in the open being hit.
I (and I believe WE) were talking about what to do when you cannot see because of the blowing snow to AVOID becomming part of one of those chain reaction collisions.
You STAY WITH THE CAR. That is the advice from virtually EVERY winter driving safety expert. And the same advice we were given when winter rallying.
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On Nov 27, 5:36pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Then quote some of them that say to stay on the highway. I also don't think you will find one saysng to stay in your vehicle during a multi car smashup.
Harry K
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wrote:

Better to stay IN the car than get hit OUT of the car. In the case of most multi-car, you can't easily move off the highway.
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sI'm jusst saying what the experts say. "get off the road if you can". I recall seeing mag articles saying that if caught in the middle of one of those bashes to "get out of the car and off the road until the crashing stops"
Harry K
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wrote:

There are often more deaths and serious injuries to those outside the car than tose inside after the first collision in those MVCs
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On Nov 28, 7:05pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Which is why the advice is "...until the crashing stops". The point of getting out of the car and off the road during the crashing is to keep from getting killed. Once off the road you are (comparitely) safe.
Harry K
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On Nov 27, 5:36pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

To avoid going through it again. My advice _and the expert's advice_ in heavy fog GET OFF THE RAOD IF YOU CAN. That is the entire point of my posts but you keep tying to divert into other things.
Stick to the point and this time try to come up with a reason _not_ to get as far off the road as possible.
Harry K
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wrote:

And I NEVER said not to. All I was saying is STAY IN THE DAMNED CAR IN A BLIZZARD!!!! And YOU said I was going against what the experts say. NOWHERE did I say not to get off the road - but if you are stuck and you can NOT get off the road - STAY IN THE VEHICLE. and make the vehicle conspicous. The chances of getting hit by anything other than a snowplough after more than a short time after getting stuck is pretty slim - you can't move, nor can anyone else.
IF you can still move, without hitting anything or running off the road, get off the road COMPLETELY as soon as possible. - and STAY IN THE VEHICLE unless you can reach shelter.
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On Nov 27, 9:21pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Nice try but the fact remains that I have been discussin ONLY getting off the highway with your car if you can.
Sorry that you are unable to follow a discussion.
Harry K
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wrote:

Then how come you've been dissagreeing with me and saying I was going against the experts opinions when I NEVER said not to get off the road. I did say sometimes it is IMPOSSIBLE to get off the road. I think perhaps there is someone else other than, or besides me, that cannot follow a discussion.
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