Telephone wire

Page 2 of 3  
On 7/9/2013 7:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

One of the legal things I do for money is servicing and installing commercial phone systems and computer networks (My other job is being an international hit man). Me, JH and Stinky just finished another office and in the last decade or so, we've been running CATxx network cable for phone systems since the trend, which I saw coming, was a switch to VoIP phone systems and some of the electronic phone systems we install may use 2 to 3 pair and most digital systems use 1 pair but some use 2 pair so we run at least CAT5 for phone systems. We are installing and servicing more and more VoIP phone systems and now with Gigabit networks being installed we may pull CAT6 for all the wire runs now. We have a national service corp we do work for that demands we install CAT6 for all cable runs. I actually have to use test gear to check the properties of the installed cable and Email the results of tests for each cable. The OP could could have 26 AWG or smaller if it's an import. Manufacturers in Asia will often skimp on materials used to manufacture their products. The import wire could be a lot smaller than what is normally supplied by factories in Western countries. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Their people smaller, too! . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
The OP could could have 26 AWG or smaller if it's an import. Manufacturers in Asia will often skimp on materials used to manufacture their products. The import wire could be a lot smaller than what is normally supplied by factories in Western countries. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/09/2013 01:27 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

Really, next time you do this just pull CAT5 or CAT6. works better and is more future proof (if you decide you want to convert your phone outlets to ethernet)
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Makes a lot of sense. In this case, the run was across the attic then drop into a closet and back into the wall with the cover plate right next to the closet door. Running a new wire would be pretty easy.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Any chance you'll be using it for internet DSL? How many feet of it did you use. Regardless, if you don't get the proper speeds, you'll want to replace this thin wire with something thicker.
Even if you get FIOS, doesn't the in-house wiring stay the same, and this wire might be slower than thicker wire would be.

Wow. Never heard of that before.

Despite what so many posters are saying, not all phone wire is 24 gauge anymore. They probably haven't noticed because they don't buy the really cheap stuff, but as that story goes, there isn't anything that can't be made cheaper. etc.
Wire meant for modular plugs comes in different thicknesses too. I bought 100 feet of something -- I'll see if it's marked on the spool -- and the wire was so thing that though internet radio was still working, other parts of the net didn't work. I ended up calling Verizon, just to check the line from the office, and they ended up sending someone out. I don't know if they charged me or not. I hope not since I didn't ask for anyone to come. Nonetheless, he told me that parts of the net can work while other parts don't, and one reason is wire that is too thin.
I went back to the wire I had been using, and everything worked again. But later I compared my download speed (as shown on that webpage) with what Verizon said it was selling me, and my speed was 1/3 what it should have been.
First I was mad at them, but I thought about a while and figured out I might be the cause. Found myself some even thick, round, white inside-the-wall phone line and used that instead, and my download speed tripled.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The others are right. Because of the shielding in CAT5 and 6, you can run thin wire and still get high computer speeds. At least that's what they tell me in a ocmputer connectivity ng. I'll know for sure when I change wires later this summer. (Even though my current wire is fast, I need thin to get past an obstruction.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

is not part of the standard.. Don't know what kind of obstruction you are looking at - but cat 5 comes in different jacket thicknesses - as much as 25% difference in diameter. Non Plenum FT4) cable is GENERALLY thinner than FT6 (plenum). Here in Ontario FT6 is required if it is run in an air plenum (above suspended ceiling where the air return is open, for example) and it is almost twice as expensive as FT4. Some of the pricier FT6 has a thin teflon type covering which is quite tough, and very easy to pull.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Cat 5 is different than cat3, for instance. Cat 3 is 3-4 twists per foot. Cat 5 is 4-4 twists per INCH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/09/2013 05:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've installed scads of CAT-5 and never seen four twists per inch, but it certainly has more twists than CAT-3.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/10/2013 8:24 AM, Jon Danniken wrote:

The different pairs have an alternating twists in them so they don't match the twist of the other pairs. The reason for that is to resist or eliminate crosstalk. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The different pairs have an alternating twists in them so they don't match the twist of the other pairs. The reason for that is to resist or eliminate crosstalk. ^_^
What? Echo in here? I'm not twisted enough. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
The different pairs have an alternating twists in them so they don't match the twist of the other pairs. The reason for that is to resist or eliminate crosstalk. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 Jul 2013 10:57:51 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

enough", is there????/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I resemble that remark. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
No danger of EVER having Stormy accused of being "not twisted enough", is there????/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/10/2013 07:21 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Yes, that I have noticed, as I use it as hookup wire after pulling the pairs out of the sheath.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have FIOS.
I just moved my office from one room in the house to another. I first ran a coax line for the FIOS router, then setting up other things in the room, I realized I needed a phone outlet on a different wall. The simplest way to do that was to run a new line into the room.
I'm not using the line for data and the voice quality sounds fine.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/9/2013 9:18 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

Is the wire you bought flat like this?
http://www.truevalue.com/product/Phone-Line-Cord-Almond-50-Ft/18430.uts?keyword=phone%20cord#activeTab0
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I was thinking that, but hadn't yet written. Might be he bought modular four conductor flat wire. Which is a whole different animal.
Is the wire in question four conductors in a line, or four wrapped into a round sheath? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
On 7/9/2013 9:18 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

Is the wire you bought flat like this?
http://www.truevalue.com/product/Phone-Line-Cord-Almond-50-Ft/18430.uts?k eyword=phone%20cord#activeTab0
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope, round, like this:
http://tinyurl.com/pholnq8
But it came in a flat pack and doesn't have printing on the wire.
I looked at all 3 pages, and didn't see the exact item I bought.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not even embossed, maybe seeable when you hold it up to the light at different angles?
Anyhow, round also comes in different gauges. I like TrueValue but still I point out that there is no gauge given for this wire. Even under the tab called Specifications.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope, it's up in the attic, I was using a flashlight to look.
This thread is getting so many replies I'm tempted to take a trip down to the hardware store to check, but I did buy the last one in the store. No guarantee that they'll restock with the same stuff.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.