Taper Between Door Jamb and Wall

Hi,
I installed a prehung door in my bathroom. It is square and plumb. After installing the casing I noticed that the space between the lock side casing tapers from about 7-1/4" at the top to 6-3/4" at the bottom in the space between the edge of the casing and the casing on a bifold door on an adjoining wall. It is very noticeable and I'm wondering what I can do to make it less visible.
Here are a couple of photos http://www.flickr.com/photos/ladedah/sets/72157641929664704/
Any advice appreciated!
James
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/5/2014 6:06 PM, James wrote:

Level and plumb often have little to do with what looks right. If the bricks are out of level and you get religious about running a ceiling line at true level, it will look wrong, no matter who is technically right. You need to be more than willing to compromise to circumstances and existing conditions. Forget dead true plumb (though I wonder how you are determining) and be willing to compromise to existing circumstances. Often, a small adjustment to each will make it look right. Hope this helps. Over 40 working years in the business.
--


___________________________________

Keep the whole world singing . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 03/05/2014 06:53 PM, DanG wrote:

I'm glad you wrote that. I never level things all too well. I keep telling my wife that if it looks OK, it's OK.
Our house built in 1898 was probably never square to begin with.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 5 Mar 2014 18:53:44 -0600, DanG wrote

Well I wish I could do that but I did not realize this was an issue until my wife painted the area and I installed the casing. I had a lot of trouble hanging the door due to the rough frame being twisted I am not inclined to remove it and start over. If I had installed it to make that one edge look right the door would not have worked and would have looked terrible. I used a 6' level for the hinge side which is standard practice and adjusted the rest of the door frame in accordance with the way it should be done. I have made acceptable compromises in installing three other doors in my house and this is just one of times where I have to deal with an issue I did not foresee.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James:
Put a spirit level on the bifold door casing. I expect you'll find that it's not plumb.
It's not that noticable. You notice it because you know it's there.
Short of redoing the bifold door now, one way to hide this is to paint that wall the same colour as the door casings. (?) That way, the wall area between the casings won't be as noticably wider at the top than at the bottom.
--
nestork


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 05 Mar 2014 18:21:49 -0700, nestork

Stripes?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One of the doors isn't plumb. Fix the one that isn't.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dadi,
I think that it's not a door that's the problem. The wall that holds the bifold door is the problem. It's not level, it leans slightly Distracting the eye might be a good fix. Is there room when the bifold door swings open to hang some cheap artwork?
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 6 Mar 2014 11:36:23 -0600, David L. Martel wrote

I'm sure there is. That is a good idea to ponder.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 6 Mar 2014 07:29:35 -0600, dadiOH wrote

That sounds kinda doable. The wall where the bifold door is is the problem but I suppose I could pull the casing off and shim it out. Just kinda hate to do that since I replaced all the trim on that door a short time ago. Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


You got a lot of good ideas on how to fix the problem. You attempt to justify your laziness by not wanting to follow any advice. You need to get off your fat ass, or shut the fuck up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/5/2014 7:06 PM, James wrote:

If the new door is truly perfectly plumb then it is clear that the bifold and/or the wall it is mounted in can't be. I'd investigate further to find out what is right and what is wrong before worrying about any fixes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 5 Mar 2014 18:31:21 -0600, Oren wrote

Sorry I should have been clearer: it is the area painted green. The door you are referring to is to my garage is beyond the door in question. I probably should have shut the bathroom door so you couldn't see it..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just avoid anything that has straight lines or squares or rectangles<g>.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.