Tankless water heaters -- inneresting take.

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many years ago a dealer told me there was no such law. That concerned my chevy citation
Sears sold me a $900.00 wood brsh chipper I wore the chipper blade out in ONE MONTH, prepping a home for sale. It was totally overgrown. think forest:)
Sears was unable to provide parts...
lots of products are like that today:(
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wrote:

You just love to change subjects.

...again, and again.
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What manufacturers do is sell "assemblies" They don't have to keep individual parts in inventory, and they can make more money selling you stuff you don't need Same as "wiper refills" when all you actually need is the blade.
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On Sat, 2 Feb 2013 15:01:53 -0600, "Attila Iskander"

Other way around - they sell the whole blade when all you need is the refill.
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Please don't bother Attila with details. He's already forgotten that electricity can be stored in batteries. I was going to mention in capacitors, as well, but I didn't want to risk him having an epileptic seizure or sumpn....
--
EA




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On 2/3/2013 8:24 AM, Existential Angst wrote:

In some parts of my state, electricity is stored behind dams. ^_^
TDD
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And do they actually suck water from downstream to pump it back into the dam ??
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On 2/3/2013 12:39 PM, Attila Iskander wrote:

Not that I know of but I have seen such a system or proposal for one some years ago. I don't know without researching if it has ever been implemented but it's been years since I read about it in a science magazine. ^_^
TDD
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they do that at niagra falls, during the night they pump water from the river and release it during the day thru turbines to help cover peak loads.......
during tourist hors theres a limit on how much water niagra power can use, so the falls dont dry up.
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wrote:
message

The turbines do both. Niagara isn't the only place its done, either, though with the demise of nuclear there's a lot less activity in this area than there was thirty years ago.

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Hmmmmm....... I think they call it...... R-A-I-N??? Not sure..... hmmmm..... let me look it up, just to be sure.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain
--
EA





>



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Attila Iskander wrote:

Yes. In California a few years ago, during one of their periods of energy scarcity, several generating stations pumped water back into the resevoir during off-peak hours (night). The California equivalent of a perpetual-motion machine.
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And where did they get the power to run those "pumps" ?
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wrote:

I would imagine it comes from some of the water flowing through the generator, which would be the most logical source.
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On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 08:57:50 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

At least in the ones I'm familiar with it comes from power on the grid generated by turbines, waterfalls, and nukes that don't get shut down at night-- they normally just run the power to ground.
Jim
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On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 08:57:50 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Ah, thermodynamics repealed!
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On Feb 4, 1:32pm, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

No violation of thermodynamics involved.
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On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 10:41:50 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

It certainly is if you think you're doing this for a reason.
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On Feb 4, 1:54pm, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

The reason is to have more water available to supply more power during peak times during the day. Let's say you have 100MW of generating capacity from water flow from the normal flow of a river. The generator could supply 130MW if there were more water flow, but the river is only capable of 100MW. At night, the demand is only 60MW. So, at night you take the extra 40MW that isn't needed and use it to power pumps to move water to a reservoir upstream of the generator. The next day, when you need more than 100MW, you start releasing that extra water, boosting the generator output above 100MW.
Nothing there violates thermodynamics and there is a reason for it. The power generating company has just help meet peak demand and gotten paid for electricity that it would otherwise have not been able to produce. Feel free to admit you're wrong at any time.
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Good idea except it does not work that way. Even at 100% efficency, only the ammount of water going down hill can only pump the same ammount back uphill. If 100 MW of water is turning the turbins, it will take more than 100 MW to turn the pumps to get the water back to the top.
For the system to work, it starts off like you say. The the flow of water going down hill is stopped at night. The pumps and the other users are supplied with power from other sources on the grid such as coal powered plants that have the excess capacity at night.
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