Sump pumps -- GFCI required?

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Mark wrote:

I am the OP. I do not know for sure when the sump pump trips the GFCI. I own the property but another family lives there, not me. When I checked the basement recently, there was water in the basement in the sump pump area, about 1-2 inches above the floor level. There was no power to the sump pump, and resetting the GFCI made the pump turn on and it pumped out all of the water without tripping the GFCI again.
The sump pump is on a dedicated circuit that goes directly from the main panel (on its own 15-amp breaker) to the GFCI receptacle in the ceiling. Nothing else is on that circuit -- no switches, no receptacles, etc.
The sump pump had been there for 3+ years and used to be plugged into a regular, non-GFCI, outlet elsewhere in the basement with an extension cord. During those 3 years, it never failed to work.
The new dedicated sump pump circuit with the ceiling GFCI outlet above the sump pump was installed 6 months ago by a licensed electrician. I guess it is possible that the pump tripped the GFCI some time during the last 6 months and no one noticed it. The family that lives there rarely goes into the basement and may not have thought to check the basement for water after a rain. But, my guess is that the GFCI was tripped more recently.

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In my opinion the "Electrical code" is writing by bunch of F------ morons Yes we need some type of guidance but some of codes are so stupid and unusable it is not funny it is ridicules. Because some dumb bastard did something stupid got self kill, then they punished all of people by putting some nuisance code that all rest of us got to pay for it and those are facts, the system in this Country is that it don't make any since. I do not care if any one agree with me or not, over 40 years working for industry I seen it all. But then again their are some license Electricians doing such slapy work I would not just take their license, but put them in jail for few years.

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John Grabowski wrote:

If I figure out who the NFPA is, and what their contact/mailing information is, I may just do that.

I think that is a good suggestion. It makes sense and it solves the problem that is intended to be solved by the new NEC. Maybe you could write to the NFPA too and submit your suggestion to them.
In terms of safety, one problem with the latest code for sump pumps in unfinished basements is that the GFCI could cause the pump to fail and the basement to flood. Then, there would be the newly-created hazard of someone walking in the water and accidentally coming into contact with any electrical power source in the basement.
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NFPA = National Fire Protection Agency. www.nfpa.org
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On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 19:58:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

He can save the 44 cents and just read what they say in the ROP about GFCIs. There are always numerous proposals to reduce the number of circuits requiring GFCIs and the trend always goes the other way. Now (2008 code) you will have AFCIs virtually everywhere you don't have GFCI and they have ground fault protection in them. If your sump pump trips a GFCI, it will probably trip an AFCI. Same with that old fridge you have out in the garage for your beer.
In the case of your pump, I would carefully inspect it to be sure water hasn't gotten in the switch or motor housing. That may be your whole trouble. If you still want to use it, in spite of a possible leakage to ground, be damned sure the grounding is good, (even to the point of adding another bonding wire) put in a regular receptacle and say "come and get me copper" but that is not what I advise.
It may end up being "come and get me EMS"
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The pertinent article in NFPA 70 is 210.8 and you can submit your suggestion on the form below: http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/PDF/CodesStandards/NFPAProposalForm.doc

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John Grabowski wrote:

Thanks. I'll do the form and submit it. I'm not going to try to create the actual suggested wording. I'll just write something that explains what my suggestion is and why.
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wrote:

Start reading down around page 70-118 to see what NFPA thinks of changing 210.8 requirements for fewer GFCIs http://gfretwell.com/electrical/NEC_2011_ROP.pdf
The short answer is "NO"
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On Fri, 18 Dec 2009 08:35:59 -0500, "John Grabowski"

You will be writing for the 2014 code cycle. The 2011 is closed.
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On Fri, 18 Dec 2009 16:58:42 -0500, gfretwell wrote:

... and the world ends in 2012. Crap. ;-)
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My new home passed without it in 1998, things may have changed.
I personally would not want any critical piece of equipment like that on a GFCI. Mkes no sense, its in the hole anyway.
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RickH wrote:

If the Sump Pump or Freezer have 3-wire grounded cords, the shouldn't need a GFCI anyway. My Sump Pump and all three refrigerator/freezers are on non-GFCI outlets.
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You already flooded so you know the answer. Dont use one on a frige or sump pump.
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On Wednesday, December 16, 2009 at 2:25:37 PM UTC-6, Jay-T wrote:

An EC&M Article directly addressing this http://ecmweb.com/quizzes/code-quiz-gfci-protection-personnel?page=2
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On Fri, 11 Dec 2015 11:28:06 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Why would you EVER put something like a sump pump A) on a shared circuit, and / or B) - on a GFCI????
And with a ceiling mounted plug for the sump pump, nothing less than a twist-lock should even be considered - - - -Either an L5-15 or L5-20
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On 12/11/2015 02:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Taking due note of the fact that the original question was posted six years ago...
What about a duplex outlet supplying both the 120V sump pump and the charger for the battery-powered backup pump? Does that circuit need a GFCI breaker?
Perce
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On Fri, 11 Dec 2015 16:00:49 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

I would say since it is all for the sump pump it is still a dedicated circuit and should be exempt from GFCI requirement. Using the twistlock connections makes it unlikely that anything else might be plugged into the circuit. Not 100% sure of code requirements, but is how I would do it if I had a house with a sump pump.
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On Friday, December 11, 2015 at 2:28:21 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Article 620.85 applies to elevators, dumbwaiters, and escalators. The sump pump that is referred to is one that might be located in a pit under this type of equipment, NOT in a residence.
John Grabowski http://www.MrElectrician.TV
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When I was angsting over what to protect and how, I came across this article from the Mike Holt archives. Since it deals with dwellings, I assume this is the relevant section (sump pumps at very end):
https://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/NEC-HTML/HTML/GFCIProtection4Personnel~20020105.htm Dwelling Units 210.8 Ground-Fault Protection (A) Dwelling Units. (1) Bathroom Area Receptacles. GFCI protection is required for all 15A and 20A, 125V receptacles in the bathroom area of a dwelling unit. Figure 8
a.. Author's Comment: Proposals to allow receptacles for dedicated equipment in the bathroom area to be exempted from the GFCI protection rules were rejected because the code panel members felt that it was not in the interest of safety to allow appliances without GFCI protection in this area.
(2) Garage and Accessory Building Receptacles. GFCI protection is required for all 15A and 20A, 125V receptacles in garages and grade-level portions of unfinished or finished accessory buildings used for storage or work areas of a dwelling unit. Figure 9
Exception No. 1: GFCI protection is not required for receptacles that are not readily accessible, such as a ceiling-mounted receptacle for the garage door opener.
Exception No. 2: GFCI protection is not required for a receptacle on a dedicated branch circuit located and identified for a specific cord-and-plug-connected appliance, such as a refrigerator or freezer.
a.. Author's Comment: Receptacles are not required in accessory buildings, but if a 15A or 20A, 125V receptacle is installed, it must be GFCI-protected. Figure 10
(3) Outdoor Receptacles. All 15A and 20A, 125V receptacles outdoors of dwelling unit, including receptacles installed under the eaves of roofs shall be GFCI-protected. Figure 11
a.. Author's Comment: Receptacles are not required outdoors of a multifamily dwelling, but if a 15A or 20A, 125V receptacle is installed, it must be GFCI-protected. Figure 12
Exception: GFCI protection is not required for fixed electric snow melting or deicing equipment receptacles that are not readily accessible and are supplied by a dedicated branch circuit in accordance with 426.28. Figure 13
(4) Crawl Space Receptacles. All 15A and 20A, 125V receptacles installed within a dwelling unit crawl space must be GFCI-protected.
a.. Author's Comment: The Code does not require a 15A or 20A, 125V receptacle to be installed in the crawl space, except when air-conditioning or heating equipment is installed in this area, see 210.63.
(5) Unfinished Basement Receptacles. GFCI protection is required for all 15A and 20A, 125V receptacles in each unfinished portion of a basement not intended as a habitable room, but used for storage or as a work area. Figure 14
Exception No. 1: GFCI protection is not required for receptacles that are not readily accessible.
Exception No. 2: GFCI protection is not required for a receptacle on a dedicated branch circuit located and identified for a specific cord-and-plug-connected appliance, such as a sump pump.
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On Fri, 11 Dec 2015 16:44:12 -0500, "Robert Green"

Does this mean it can have a double-receptacle? And still not require GFCI?

My house was clearly designed with a receptacle right next to the sump pump. But it's a two outlet receptacle.
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