Sump pump runs very often

We get approximately a bucket of new water every hour in the sump pit. When water level reaches half of the sump pit it does not rise any higher. As a result the sump pump runs once or two in an hour. None of my neighbors have that.
Is this a problem?
Thanks,
-Stan
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Water levels vary quite a lot from lot to lot in many areas. I would not worry, but I might think about a battery or other backup for the pump.
What happens when it rains really heavy ?
Bob
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Well, I'd say that you have issues. Water full time means that you are either in the water table or on top of a spring or similar flow under your basement. If the pump works, that's good... but if the power goes off in a storm, it sounds like you're going to be very, very wet. You need alternative drainage or a battery or generator backup.
You might want to call in a pro who can consider a *passive* drain around the foundation to remove the water without a pump. Read some more at this page to enhance your understanding of drainage principles: http://www.jlcnet.com/banner/basep1.html
Is this a new house/development ?
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House was built in 1995. What also strange is that water reaches certain level and then stops or at least goes up very slowly.
I am looking for a batery backup sump pump. Before recent blackout I was thinking about backup pump that is tap water driven, but it turns out that you may not have both power and water...
-Stan
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Maybe there is some natural or other drainage that works marginally at that point.

If you have city tap water, it is very unlikely in most areas that it will stop. They pump the water into large tanks holding millions of gallons. The water is fed to you by gravity. Call your water department to be sure. It's possible that there's a pump between you and your water.
Those tap powered devices use as much water as they dump. So, you use a gallon of water for every gallon you pump.
If I were you, I'd call some drainage people (people who like to dig holes with excavators) from the local area. You want someone who has an engineering degree - not just a digger. Try people who do septic systems and also excavation. Get them to take a look and see what they say. They will know a lot more about local soil and water conditions than anyone here and can advise you on site. Of course, you may find that you can buy a quality generator with automatic startup and transfer for less than the price of a proper foundation drain, so it might not be the way to go. No one can say until you check.
Bob
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Available in my area are Sump Pumps with battery backup, made by Flotec.
www.flotecwater.com
You do need to buy a deep cycle marine battery as well.

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It could be, if the water is percolating right back down into the sump. That's why they reccomend 10 feet out, so it doesn't drain back in!
Drew
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It really depends on the depth and what's underground. My pump used to run very often, along with 2 neighbor's pumps. The town, where I live, installed an anti-backflow system in my front yard, to prevent backup from the city sewer system. Now, my sump pump hardly ever runs. We have had huge rainfalls in the last month and the neighbors were pumping water regularly. My sump was totally dry for most of the time and just recently, filled with about 3" of water ... not enough to trigger the pump. What happened here? I really don't know, however, either the anti-backflow unit is blocking the underground water flow, or it is pumping the underground water into the sewer system (this is illegal, but it is the town's doing). This unit does have an ejector to pump house sewage into the backing up sewer system when the backflow valve is actuated. There is a control box that shows when the pump is running, however, I don't sit in the basement watching it. I have only seen the pump light on once for a few seconds and that was a year or two ago. Someday I'll hook up an elapse time clock to the control box to see just how much the pump runs during non-backup times (maybe once every few years).
Stan wrote:

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Doesn't sound like it.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
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This was happening to me. The sump pump was installed incorrectly. The plumber came back and drilled a hole somewhere. Evidently what was happening is that it was sucking like a straw and couldn't get all the water out because, like a straw closed at one end, the pipe held the water in. Then when the pump turned of the check valve released and all the water flowed back in, so the pump had to run again.
Had this condition not been corrected the pump would have burned out. I am sorry if I didn't describe it better.

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