Stripped allen screw


I have a aluminum glass door where the handle is attached to the door frame via two allen screws. One of them fell out and disappeared so I have to take out the second one in order to get replacements.
The problem is that the second screw seem to be stripped. The screw is hidden behind the inside facet of the handle and the entire screw is threaded, there is not a wider bigger screw head, the screw disappears completely inside the screw hole.
Now as I tried to unscrew it, it is not coming out, I believe the hex shaped hole may be rounded, and I cannot get enough leverage to see into it. There is no room to use any kind of drills or screw extractor at that angle.
Any ideas?
MC
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 20:35:05 -0500, "MiamiCuse"

You must first clean out any residue that may be inside the head. It is important to do this so that you can set the wrench correctly before you make any further attempts. Next take a allen wrench and grind the end so that you have sharp corners. Do not chamfer these corners. Place the wrench in the hole and find a way to set it. When you pull the wrench try to keep it perpendicular. It is best to pull with a snap instead of slowly increasing torque.
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If there's no chance to use a drill or screw extractor, I'd:
1. Forget the old screw and just create a new way to fasten the handle with a new screw in a new location, or maybe even with epoxy.
or
2. Carve up the old handle with a hacksaw until all the bits fall off. Procure and install a brand new handle.
--
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You are describing a set screw. All you need to do is loosen it. You don't have to remove it.
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Yes it is a set screw. It is used to tighten and held in place the lower part of a glass door handle. I tried to remove it in order to get an identical one because the top one was missing. Now I cannot loosen it. I even tried tapping it hard into the hole and use a plier to clamp on to the L shaped wrench to no avail. I will try it again tomorrow but instead of turning it slow I will try to snap just as you suggested and see what happens.
MC
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On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 20:35:05 -0500, "MiamiCuse"

No, they're cheap. Buy 2, 3, or 4 of different sizes. Save the others for the next time you need one.

out, I believe the hex shaped hole may be rounded, and I cannot get enough leverage to see into it. There

Maybe you can use one of the 12 inch extensions. I think they are less than a half inch in diameter. Best idea here is to get from Harbor Freigh a set of left handed drill bits and use with a reversible drill. Often drilling counter clockwise will unscrew the screw, whereas drilling clockwise is guaranteed not do.
This would also be a good time to treat yourself to a flexible shaft, between the drill and tthe 12 inch extension, if it is hard to drill otherwise.
I've only seen 2 makers of ccw bits, Vermont American and Harbor Freigh, and and hf is a lot cheaper I think.
But I still think you can just replace the first set screw.

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When did you lose the first screw? If it's recent maybe you can find it with a magnet so you have a good one to use for sizing purposes to get a replacement. I'd get replacements made of stainless steel so they most likely won't strip again. Other than that I like the response where they said to saw away tha whole handle and replace it.
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While stainless is less likely to rust, I think the alloy set screws may be less prone to stripping as they are a bit tougher.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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O

Correct you are. The hex on stainless set screws easily strip.
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Buying a bunch of various size screws is an excellent suggestion.
Otherwise: Before trying it again, shoot some WD-40 into the recess and let it seep in for a while; it may help. If worse comes to worst, drill through the door handle so that you can use the long leg of the Allen wrench to reach the screw head. Put a pair of pliers on the short end so that you can simultaneously push hard and turn hard.
Or you could just hacksaw the handle off of the door.
MiamiCuse wrote:

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MiamiCuse, what are you doing over in this NG. Still ain't got that house figured out. <note to other readers, if he mentions his sound system, RUN> ;-))
Man you're trying way to hard. You want to keep the handle, right. So as the other people mentioned, go to the hardware store and buy EVERY set screw of a similar size in EVERY thread. This will set you back about the cost of a cheeseburger. Then put in the new one and forget about the old one -- it's already there and already secure.
Your other option is to drill it out and tap it, but you don't want to do that, you just want your door closed.
<third option. remove the door at the hinges and take it to a good welding shop and have the handle welded in place. Just kidding>
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