Storing a large snowblower

I am restoring a military surplus snowblower. It is a big badass Bolens 24 inch snowblower. It needs a new motor. Right now, I keep it in a shed, but I think that when I actually use it, I would like to keep it outside as it weighs more than me and is hard to get back into the shed.
So, my thinking is to keep it covered by tarp outside, during snowy part of the winter. The tarp will be held by rubber tiedowns. Will it rust completely or is this a sound plan?
thanks
i
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Many people store cars that way. I don't see how it would hurt. I'd be sure to have it sitting on something really solid though, like a cement patio or something. I wouldn't just plop it on the grass and cover it. Ideal would be to put it in a covered carport and THEN cover it with a arp. -Dave
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On Fri, 06 Feb 2004 11:02:15 -0600, Ignoramus17685

Sorry, that's not big. Big is my 7' wide truck mounted blower. It gives good blower jobs. :-)
Seriously though, I keep lots of equipment stored that way. We usually take a trash bag and cover the engine separately and then tarp the whole unit.
Kirk
"Moe, Larry, the cheese!", Curly
www.sandpoint.net/captkirk www.stormyacres.com
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My blower isn't that big but it's still an awkward sob. What I find helped tremendously was removing the drift breakers. They don't really serve much purpose and I have a dent in my car and in my garage door and a crack in my house siding where they have accidentally collided. They come off by undoing four bolts. Another benefit is I now can up end the machine if I have to work on the belts etc. Simple matter to replace them if we get a six foot snow storm. ds

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On Fri, 06 Feb 2004 11:02:15 -0600, someone wrote:

It will not rust "completely" for many years.
But seriously, while it would last longer indoors, many people, including me, have them outside in the winter. There is less rust going on when it is cold anyway.
How many years difference in life would it take for you to decide one way or the other?
-v.
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Like I said, I am repairing a large Bolens snowblower by installing a new engine (tecumseh HMSK-80 with cast iron bore). I would like the snowblower to not rust to the point of rust causing malfunction, for as long as the motor continues to operate and the rest of the snowblower is also holding up. Which could be another 20 years, or so I hope. I can use tarp diligently, if necessary, and apply some sort of a rust protectant spray for the summer.
i
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