Sticky floor - sand or solvent?


Spouse has very nicely removed the ugly linoleum-type tiles from the samll powder room's floor. Now the wood shows, but is a bit sticky. Before we finish the floor, should we just sand, or is it better to remove the "sticky" with a solvent? Room has a window, and is less than 3x10 ft.
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Best regards
Han
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Depends. If you sand you'll be changing sandpaper frequently, at least initially, because the adhesive will soften and become sticky with the heat from sanding and clog the gum up the sandpaper. If you use solvents first you'll probably be able to sand a bit less. If the floor has been sanded a number of times previously, solvents first will allow you to sand a bit less and extend the potential life of the floor.
In either event, have a strong fan blowing out the window and wear a respirator if you use solvents.
R
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-snip-

*and* leave the door open. If the room can't suck some replacement air in, you won't exhaust much through the window.
Jim
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wrote:

That's no problem!
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Han
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The way I do it is to stick the fan in the window, tape it in place with blue tape, tape some cardboard or plastic to cover around the fan so the only opening to the outside is through the fan (prevents blow back around the sides of the fan from short circuiting the exhaust air), then use a re-usable plastic 'door' made with two self-stick zippers and 6 mil poly, in the door opening, and leave the zippers cracked a bit so the door plastic is bowed into the room a bit. The in-rushing air is right at floor level and the air has only one way out of the room.
Those plastic zipper things are fantabulous. http://pro-tect.com/vmchk/Zip-Up.html You can get them for around $3 per on eBay if you buy them by the box.
R
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If you sand it, in five minutes you'll know the proper answer is solvent first. Try scraping what you can though,
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Either sand or clean but solvents to clean it are not good for you and sanding is probably quicker, so an extra belt ot 2 or a gallon of nasty stuff that might make your babies deformed [ kidding] just probably a headache and a high, id go the sand route.
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Han-
Before you try "solvent".... try warm water with very small amount of soap (like dish washing liquid)
I remove my new linoleum (2004) then the "floor evening" 1/4" plywood that had been nailed through the 1930 linoleum. Then the 1930 linoleum which left about 1/2 wood showing & 1/2 partial thickness of linoleum.
At first I tried various paint / varnish / linoleum remover, worked ok but not great...... but a lucky accident got me using warm soapy water. I scrub brushed the residue with warn slightly soapy water, let it sit a bit and shop vac up the watery mess. Then scrape with a 4" flexible putty knife followed by a bit more water and scrubbing with heavy rags.
It cleaned up very nicely.... to the point where I even considered refinishing it but I'm not a huge fan of wood in a kitchen.
The "floor" (the original kitchen sub floor) turned out to be old growth Doug Fir T&G but probably going to cover with backer & small hex tile.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

Thanks, guys. I think I'll try the warm soapy water first. The Zip-Up door sounds great too, RicodJour.
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Han
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I think the big question has to be how you intend to finish the floor and what the floor is (concrete or wood subfloor).
If it is concrete: Razor blade scrape the floor and cap the previous adhesive. Is the left over stuff black? - cutback adhesive, possible asbestos. Cap with ARdex floor leveler or similar.
If it is wood subfloor: If it will be ceramic tile, I would cap it with wonder board or Ditra. If you are applying any other type of flooring, I would suggest capping the existing wood floor with sheet goods - mdf, plywood, hardie board, etc - DO NOT BE STINGY WITH GLUE AND NAILS. You can also skim out the adhesive area with one of the Ardex products.
Here is some information: http://www.ardex.com/default.asp
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DanG
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september.org:

Thanks, guys. The floor is hardwood, oak I think, about 1/2 inch planks from 1929. As are the other parts of the first floor which we alraedy had sanded and polyurethaned. The living room etc. look now much more blond than the dark reddish powder room floor, but we'd like that to be the same as the living room - polyurethaned hardwood. We'll never sell this home, so if it's not 100% code, that's our kids' problem.
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Han
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