Stayin' Warm

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Snag wrote:

I believe because water drops coming down thru the cold air is too big to freeze or become snow. Here they banned studded tires due to road surface damage it causes. Good winter tires like Blizzak is really good but it wears like crazy. Barely it lasts two seasons. We usually depend on Michellin X Ice from Costco. Mine is due for new set next year.
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wrote:

traction lasts longer than Blizzaks - might be a WEE bit poorer the first year, but better the second, and definitely the third and forth.. Had the Blizzaks on daughters colt, Graspics on her neon, Wife's Mistique, my TransSport, my PT Cruizer, and now my Ranger. Just a set of Tiger Paw Touring All Seasons on my wife's Taurus - but if it snows badly she doesn't need to go anywhere - she's retired now. If we HAVE to go somewhere we take the truck.
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On 1/9/2014 5:22 PM, Snag wrote:

some things will never really be explained to me.
Anyhow, I suspect the groundhog will determine that we have another six weeks of winter.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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All precipitation begins as snow crystals in a cloud. In order for snow to remain as snow all the way to the ground, it must never pass through a layer of above-freezing air that is deep enough to melt it. That "deep enough" criteria explains why we get snow when it's 35*.
If the layer of 35* air is very close to the ground then it will not be deep enough to melt the snow before it hits the ground. The term "very close" is relative. The colder the upper layers of air are, the "deeper" the layer of warm air near the ground must be before the snow will turn to rain.
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Under these circumstances, the air close to the ground is colder than the air aloft. Rain can fall through the colder air.
Snow forms under specific conditions, which aren't present at 29 F on the ground.

The air aloft is colder than the air near the ground. The snow falls quickly enough that it doesn't entirely melt on its way down.
Cindy Hamilton
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Actually, freezing rain can't "fall" on anything.
In a nutshell...
All precipitation basically starts out as snow crystals inside of a cloud. What happens after the crystals leave the cloud determines what we get at ground level.
Snow:
If the crystals pass through air that stays below freezing from the cloud to the ground, it remains as snow all the way to the ground and we have to shovel it.
Rain:
If the crystals pass through air that is warm enough to melt it and that warm layer extends all the way to the ground, it remains as rain and we get wet.
Freezing Rain:
If the crystals pass through air that is warm enough to melt it, but there is a very shallow layer of air that is below freezing close to ground level, the rain freezes when it lands on the sub-freezing surface of trees, cars, roads, etc. and we slide off the road, lose power due to downed wires, etc.
Sleet:
If the crystals pass through air that is warm enough to melt it and then pass through air that is cold enough and "deep" enough to refreeze it, we get hit by little ice pellets that sting our faces.
Hail:
If the crystals pass through air that is warm enough to melt it and an updraft sends the water droplets back up into the cloud, the water freezes on the ice crystals in the cloud, forming an ice pellet. If this "come down, get wet, go back up and freeze" cycle happens again, the ice pellet gets a little bigger. If it happens multiple times, and the pellets get very big, we end up with dented cars, broken windows and headaches.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Thanks for the 'splanation !
--
Snag



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Anytime!
If you want to know what Lake Effect Snow and/or a Ground Blizzard is, just ask. ;-)
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On 1/10/2014 9:16 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

My fav is a combo of ground bliz coupled with a white-out in the middle of a desert while trying to navigate down a hillside. Hmm, I don't recall any cliffs this way...ooo, that sounded bad. :-)
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On 1/10/2014 10:16 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

And Buffalo, NY area has pictures to prove it.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 1/10/2014 10:08 PM, Snag wrote:

Interesting, but he did not explain how it is affected by winchill
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Snow ends up in drifts. rain makes you wet on one side, freesing rain coats one side of your car, and hail breaks windows and dents siding instead of damaging roofs.
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Walter Winchill?
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On 1/10/2014 10:24 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I'd need to know that, if I'm deciding if I want to insullate the pipes that aren't wrapped. Or if I want to leave a faucet dripping.
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On Sat, 11 Jan 2014 09:20:43 -0500, Stormin Mormon

on all the "exposed" pipes and wraping them with fiberglass pipe-wrap.
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On Sat, 11 Jan 2014 02:29:47 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Wrong. How the droplets form (liquid/solid - condensation/sublimation) depends on the temperature in the cloud.

Nope. If the water-ice forms by sublimation and it's below freezing all the way down; snow.

Nope. If the water forms by condensation or ice (snow) by sublimation) and is warmer than freezing as it falls; rain.

When the rain, by whatever means, falls into a temperature inversion and the ground temperature is below freezing; "freezing rain".

Nope. When the water rain (by either condensation or sublimation than thaw) (re)freezes on the way down; sleet.

Again, no need to start out as snow. Water rain works just as well.
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http://www.weather.com/encyclopedia/winter/precip.html
"All precipitation starts out as ice or snow crystals at cloud level. When this frozen precipitation falls into a layer of sufficiently warmer air (with temperatures above freezing) it melts into rain. If this warm air extends all the way to the surface of the earth, rain will fall at ground level."
You can read the rest for yourself...I think.

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On Sat, 11 Jan 2014 22:47:09 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Wrong, of course. Summer rains are not frozen, anywhere.
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wrote:

gee, hail is just a figment of peoples imagination?
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On Sat, 11 Jan 2014 20:42:53 -0800, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds"

Gee, Malformed is too damned stupid to learn how to read. Who wudda figured! What a moron!
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