Stainless or copper fire pit

...couldn't find a newsgroup for the topic so I thought I'd throw it into the mix here.
I'm looking for one of those fire-bowls with a screen cover for the patio. I figure the ones made of thin mild steel would last a year, tops. Any experience if either the stainless or copper ones are better?
The spark screens they come with probably have to just burn up after a couple good fires. Do they? Where can I get some heavier stainless mesh to make a proper screen with?
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I don't reccomend an open fire of any kind on a wooden patio regardless.
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wrote:

So what do you recommend for a stone or concrete patio?
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I make no reccomendation. This person has not mentioned a masonry patio. Opinion: any commerical fire pit would do with a stone or concrete base. Why do you ask? Just to be a smartass? I prefer you address your comment to the OP rather than to me.
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You don't get to make choices on a public forum; you join in as part of a conversation. You made a statement. It did not answer the original question. I was curious about it. That is the purpose of the newsgroup, to learn.
Now it may vary by region, but around here, a patio is usually a stone, concrete, or other masonry area on the ground. Wood is used to make a deck, generally a raised structure. When the OP mentioned "patio" I assumed he was talking about a masonry structure of some sort.
PATIO A patio (from the Spanish: patio meaning 'back garden' or 'backyard) is an outdoor space generally used for dining or recreation that often adjoins a residence and is typically paved. It may refer to a roofless inner courtyard of the sort found in Spanish-style dwellings or a paved area between a residence and the garden. Patios are typically made of concrete or stone slabs laid over a firm base. This base is often formed of a layer of compacted hardcore (stone chips), a layer of sharp sand, and a layer of cement mortar. The firmness and stability of the base is essential to the robustness of the top layer of slabs - an infirm base will typically result in cracked slabs. Patios that hold a lot of weight, such as driveways, require stronger foundations than those that are designed for light use.
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...I have a patio made from concrete pavers. ...Lawrence ("professional asshole" per your user profile)... I'm aware of the corrosion/heat problems with thin gauge plain steel, and that a thin steel screen will literally burn up, I'm considering manufacturing making my own spark screen from heavy gauge stainless mesh... I think I know not to build a fire on a wood deck. ; )
I'm still concerned that the thin gauge stainless and copper bowls ($99 range) may still be junk (short life span). Anyone have some direct experience?
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joseph wrote:

What you need is a butt weld end cap in one of the larger sizes. I guarantee you that these will last a while. They are not something that you can just pick up anywhere and they are expensive, but if you want a fire pit to last, they are the way to go.
Here is a source:
http://www.pipefittings.net/?a11 RBON%20WELD%20FITTINGS&pagerbon_weld_fittings
A 20" or 24" should be a good size, but you can get them up to 48". I got one of these from an industrial job I was working on and it lasted for 25 years, then I sold it for a $100. It was used when I got it. I used it for a fire pit after welding on some legs. I had an expanded metal grate to put over it for barbecue.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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