splitting axe/maul

Page 3 of 3  


30 years ago I may have done just that. Today, I'd rather buy oil with that money and program the thermostat.

I'm planning to upgrade my snow blower this year too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A few more facts, please. What do you have now? Logs? (long round pieces) Rounds? (short round pieces) What kind of wood? How long ago was the wood cut? Was it alive or dead when cut? Is it dried out, or wet?
Please describe as best you can the appearance ....... does it still have bark, and can that be pulled off easily or hard to pull off? Is it dry or wet? Is there beads of sap or pitch oozing out of the ends?
You have several things to consider here, one of them might be if the wood is even able to be used this season. (Wood needs to "season" to dry out so it burns better.)
Read up and get the basics. There's more to it than just cutting firewood, as you are already finding out.
Are you ever considering harvesting your own wood? That opens up a totally new discussion.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic this thread is! And in all the posts I did look at, not a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation; just guesses & the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine wheel pf the correct design; fills the bill every time. The angle of the sharpening s actually the most mortant thing to get right regardless of what you want to sharpen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And just what is that angle?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

The angle depends on what you're sharpening. I just measure them on new parts or while parts are new, and record them but even a dull edge measurement will get you into the ballpark. So in essence, copy whats there to start with.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here is a good start http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/selecting-bevel-angle.aspx
Type of Knife or Tool Recommended Angle Cleaver Machete 30 - 35 Degrees
Hunting Knives Pocket Knives Survival Knives Sport Knives 25 - 30 Degrees
Chef's Knives Kitchen Knives Smaller Knives Boning Knives Carving Knives 18 - 25 Degrees
Fillet Knives Paring Knives Razors X-Acto Knives 12 - 18 Degrees
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Can we see your link for validation/clarification, please?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

No, no one here deserves my putting in the Googles for it. I don't provide them when no one else does or I have no good reason to; do your own research now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sorry, but I'm not into angles on splitting wedges or mauls. There is none. There is no sharp edge to be made. It seriously reduces the effectiveness of the tool.
But you knew that, right?
Now, I think I'll go put a 7 degree edge on my hydraulic sharpener just to make it work better.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All of the old timers use 8 degrees. Took me a long time to learn that, but what a differenced. Used to take me an hour a cord, now I can get it done in 60 minutes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

I find the extra degree allows me a closer shave. Or at least it used to before the coumadin ...........
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You need to understand how a splitting tool works. Nothing happens until it "enters" the wood and after than the point never touches the wood, the split runs ahead of it. A dull edge just makes the work harder.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One of the best examples was the guy who claimed you can't sharpen a maul because the material is too hard !!

File here followed by a stone if I want a _really_ sharp edge (rarely happens) Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

Agreed, Harry. Nothng discussed here so far really wants a scary sharp edge; they won't last for shinola on grass or wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Elm! I cut some Red Elm two years ago. It was part of a deal with a farmer to get a batch of Black Locust trees (#1 firewood). I will never, ever fool with that stuff again. Even with a splitter I had to use a hatchet to cut the strings.
I am now burning it. Very good wood, burns hot, burns long but the worst wood I have ever burned for the amount of ash it leaves. It is also a very light, feathery ash dthat I have poke down through the stove grate. I am emptying the ashpan every 2-3 days vice the 4-5 days I was used to witht other wood. Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

With elm there seems to be a small window- about 2-3 years after it dies - where the strings are gone, but the wood will still burn-- if really dry.
But even at that, remember this one from the old Farmers Almanac "Elm wood new or elm wood old, even the embers are very cold"
[I can't find that-- but here are a couple poems that cover a raft of woods- http://thankstrees.tripod.com/id16.html ]
I might be mis-remembering this stanza; "Oaken logs, if dry and old Keep away the winters cold Poplar gives a bitter smoke Fills your eyes and makes you choke Elmwood burns like churchyard mould Even the very flames burn cold Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread So it is in Ireland said Applewood will scent the room Pears wood smells like a flower in bloom But Ashwood wet and Ashwood dry A King may warm his slippers by. "

That's been my experience, too. I would burn elm to get it out of the way-- The best wood I ever burned was untreated 20' telephone poles. Most were 30-40 year old locust or red cedar. The cedar burned super hot and the locust lasted forever. [not to mention they were all nice straight poles and were free-- and delivered.<g>]
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Love Black Locust. The Locust Borer is killing them off around here and I am cutting everything I can find, currently have more than 40 cords cut/split/stacked and have about 6 more cords "in the round" waiting to be split. Just cut my last one Monday for this season.
B Locust here is an imported species, most was planted by the settlers back in the 1800 adn 1900s.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just to update we had a cold night and today notice a lot more checks. At least now I can which ones are willing to be split. Over and out!
Don

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can see a lot by observing.
Yogi.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.