Specialty drywall trims

I was browsing websites looking for light coves but came across some interesting trims for drywalls, but not exactly sure of their applications.
Here are two of them:
http://www.gordonceilings.com/Div9/FinalForms/drywalltrim/specialshapes.aspx
About half way down you will see "Projection Wall Base" part number 937-WB-825
Is this designed to finish off the base of a wall to the floor without needing a baseboard? I am trying to visualize what this would look like.
Also here:
http://www.gordonceilings.com/Div9/FinalForms/drywalltrim/bases.aspx
This allows you to install the drywall and "hang" it above the finish floor to create a floating effect? Is the recessed area below typically left recessed as shown in the figure or would you still put a baseboard into the recessed area?
Thanks,
MC
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MiamiCuse wrote:

That *is* the baseboard assembly. It is an extrusion that you install and it can in turn accept fancy finish inserts.

Again, that *is* the baseboard. In this case, you don't drywall the bottom 2.5"-8" of the wall and then install this fancy recessed baseboard.
Also note that "A" dimension is 5/8", i.e. it is intended for commercial use where drywall is all 5/8" thick type X firecode.
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Pete C. wrote:

Yes, it is almost always used in commercial environments (at least I have never seen it in a residential setting). It allows you to have a flush wall all the way to the floor. The base is recessed and does not interfere with the room space in any way.
Rubber cove base can be applied to this base (common), or stained base is attached to accent (more rare) the wall.
Either way, the base does not protrude into the room like standard base moulding. Think about such things as filing cabinets and how this allows them to fit tighter to the wall.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Robert Allison wrote:

I don't think that is the design purpose of the stuff. As you can see in the pics on the site, it's intended more to give a flashy high tech look with the shadow line of the recessed baseboard and the shiny brushed AL trim. If you just want clearance to shove file cabinets close to the wall, you use the vastly cheaper vinyl base molding.
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Pete C. wrote:

Might not be THE design purpose, but it is one of them. And I have seen it with both vinyl cove base and wooden trim. I have seen it used by itself.
It is just one of the features that that design gives you.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Interesting I was reading their installation guide:
http://www.gordonceilings.com/Div9/FinalForms/drywalltrim/installguide.aspx
says: 3. Cut out gypsum board with router.
Is this necessary to use a router on a drywall? I have always cut drywall by simply scoring and snap and I always get nice clean edges. Isn't a router an overkill and too dusty? Does not seem like with their trims you really need a perfect perfect line.
MC
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Routers (actually high speed cutout tools) are used mainly to cut out electrical boxes, switches, outlets. I have not seen them used for cutting to length or width, but I have not done any commercial drywall for a while. Cutting and snapping is still the most standard method.
http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/how-to/articles/cutting-drywall.aspx
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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on 1/5/2008 11:10 PM MiamiCuse said the following:

Look at the picture on the main page. It shows what the trim looks like on the wall and columns. The trim you mention looks like it is meant as the base so that the wall appears to be suspended above the floor.

You could use a baseboard in the recess, or a baseboard heating panel. These all look like they are for commercial applications and could be pretty expensive.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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