Space heater problem

I've got a several-year-old Holmes floor model space heater (no model number on it) that shuts off the heat, though set to maximum, while the area is still too cold. It worked fine last winter.
I assume it's a thermostat problem. I suspect it's fatal but if anyone knows of something that might help you'll save me the expense of a new heater.
TIA
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On 12/24/2014 09:37 AM, KenK wrote:

Here is what happened when someone tried to fix their own space heater
http://splitwise.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/space-heater.jpg
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Echo!!
squeegees :o(
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May be the thermostat, could be the safety switch that turns if off when knocked over. Or some overheating sensor. Does it go back on by itself once it shuts off?
Problem is, the part will probably cost about the same as a new heater.
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squeegees wrote:

I saw no indication someone tried to repair the heater . How did you get that idea from the picture ?
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KenK-
I have had a Holmes floor model convection space heater for several years with no problems.
According to its instructions, it will turn itself off if it overheats. You have to unplug it and allow it to cool down before it will reset.
If yours is set to full-on, it may internally overheat and shut off before the room has reached a comfortable temperature. Mine keeps the room around 70 to 75 degrees F with the thermostat set to eleven o'clock.
I can hear the thermostat contacts make and break as I turn the thermostat up and down in a warm room, and a light comes on when it is turned above that point. If you can not hear yours, its contacts could be stuck. I would try setting it counter clockwise and tapping the control, to see if the contacts might break free.
Fred
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I have electric heaters made with no thermostat at all. People just had to remember to turn them off. If they didn't, it got too hot, but still didn't cause a fire If something that an electric heater can set fire to is close enough to be a hazard, it's a hazard right away, long before the thermostat will turn the heater off.
They are also a hazard if they fall over or are knocked over. if a person knocks one over, he should put it upright again. If you have a baby or a toddler or anyone so young he doesn't know what to do, including pets, he shouldnt' have access to the heater even if it is upright.
One of my heaters my mother bought when I was born, almost 68 years ago, because the bathroom (which was the size of a medium-sized bedroom in those days) didn't get hot enough. It has a foot switch on the front and was in perfect condition, even the cloth or silk covered cord, until 10 or 20 years ago. It was stored under the sink, along with toilet bowl cleaner in a cardboard cylinder. I let the cleaner sit there too long and eventually humidity must have helped it escape the cardboard, and the chrome on the heater ended up pitted, like a car's chrome. But the heater still works fine.
It has a built-in fan, and I also have another one with no fan at all. I like that one because it makes no noise. However, despite all the posts I've made about my furnace problems, I've never used any electric heater here.
Anyone know if there are there external thermostats he could get to turn off the AC when the room is warm. After bypassiing whatever is broken inside.
BTW, Ken, I don't know where your road service thread is, but when I'm 80, I probbly won't want to change tires either. One suggestion in addition to no-flat tires is Fix-a-flat in a can or compeittors like Slime. It has gooey stuff inside that some mechanics don't like, but it also has compressed air inside, and if the leak is not big, can usually pump up the tire to where it's rideable.
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On 12/24/2014 2:25 PM, micky wrote:

will provide a coating on the inside. If a puncture occurs, it's supposed to seal. Though, I have no first hand experience. Just repeating hearsay.
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wrote:

I've used fix-a-flat quite a few times, when i lived where there was a lot of junk on the road and I got quite a few flats, but I've only used Slime once. A friend was out of town. He said he had a slow leak and he asked me to get a can and put it in the tire that was low. I did, and I immediately drove around for a couple miles. IIRC, it worked. IIRC, I bought the large can by mistake or just to be sure even though his tires were small enough that they recommended the small can.
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Thanks for the reminder. I'd completely forgotten about that stuff. I saw a friend use it on a flat once and it worked fine. I'll have to pick up a can or two next time I go to Walmart - probably Saturday.
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when something closes the door from the inside.
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What Squeegees said....
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If you decide to replace it, I have 3 small heaters I bought at Big Lots 3 years ago and all work great. The thing that sold me on those was that they are completely metal except for parts that don't get hot, like knobs and the handle on top. They were $25 each at that time. Seems like I saw them this year too for the same price, but not sure. From the label...
Comfort Zone Howard Berger Co. Model CZ798 1500W July 2011
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You'r e welcome. When I lived somewhere that caused an awful lot of flats, I got a can, then thought, "If I use the can, I'll have no can. So I'd better get two cans." Then I thought, "If I have two cans and I use a can, I'll only have one can, and I already figured out that one can is not enough, so I'd better have three cans." I thought this might continue to 100 or 1000 cans but it seemed to stop at 3. Here I only carry one.
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On 12/25/2014 10:29 PM, micky wrote:

Actually, three is a pretty safe number. Also allows for "buddy aid" where you be a good sam, and stop for others with flat tires along the highway to Damascus. After all, the priest, the traveller, and the Levite all drive past, and ignore the poor guy with the flat tire.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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