Diff between a $20 and $100 1500W space heater

I was in Lowes looking for a space heater and saw several different 1500W models. Some as little as $20, and others like the Vornado and those upright tower heaters for like $100. Does one model heat better than another? I thought all 1500W heaters put out the same heat.
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What's the difference between a Yugo and a Porsche ?
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Not 1500 watts. The Porsche can out perform a Yugo in speed and handling , but a 1500 watt heater is going to heat the same as any other 1500 watt heater.

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True enough, the difference isn't in the amount of heat, which is obviously the same. The difference is in the quality of the build, the safety devices built into the better heater, which will be reflective in how well it works and how long it lasts

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1500 watts is 1500 watts. I also looked into those things Paul Harvey was pushing and from the ads it seemed they had changed physics and kept the heat around you and it wouldn't rise as would normally happen! Those were very expensive and also 1500 watts. You only get 1500 watts out no matter how deliver it through light bulbs or heated wires.
Rich
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replying to Rich, SURV69 wrote: Evidently, it appears that the real need is in the *distribution of heat*, and in every case it appears that a space heater on the floor might heat our feet, but eventually heats the ceiling and at that point might be lost. SO, it seems that distribution, re-distribution is the most important factor.
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Uncle Monster posted for all of us...

The gerbils helped celebrate Thanksgiving mourning the loss of Rich.
--
Tekkie

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On 11/24/2017 2:00 PM, Tekkie® wrote:

We had the gerbils for Thanksgiving dinner. They were the appetizer course.
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Tastes like rodents ?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Rat_(film)
note - Richard Dawson in a supporting role.
.. they wish they had a space heater - so om topic.
John T.
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In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 23 Nov 2017 20:14:05 GMT, SURV69

You need a heater that makes non-rising heat.
When you invent one of those, you'll be rich.
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On 11/25/2017 03:12 AM, micky wrote:
[snip]

Keep the room above at a higher temperature. Then the heat in this one won't rise.
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Back to OP's subject: Diff between a $20 and $100 1500W space heater
The answer is: $80.00
Geez, can't believe y'all missed that one fer all this rigmarole. ;)
nb
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On 11/25/2017 05:44 PM, notbob wrote:

Thanks for answering the question.

--
29 days until the winter celebration (Monday December 25, 2017 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
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On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 04:39:03 -0700, Mikepier wrote:

It shouldn't be just the electrical energy the heater consumes. It should be how well it warms the full room.
IIRC, there isn't, but there should be, a standard specification on the BTU transferred to the room; a heat exchange efficiency rating if you will.
Example: I have one of those oil filled heaters that looks like an old time radiator. It just sits there, and the air right near the heater is very warm. 3 feet away, it is slightly warm, but at 6 feet away little usefulness. Do a Google on your Vornado, and read the hype at their web site; it doesn't appear the Vornado just sits there.
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Phil Again wrote:

I like the oil filled radiator style because they are silent. We have ceiling fans in every room so they work well.
If the Vornado is very very quiet then It may be good to look into? Otherwise it's just a fancy version of a $14.88 fan heater from WalMart.
For any heater type remember that if you just heat the air the room will not be comfortable for very long. You must heat everything in the room as well. furniture, walls etc. Kevin
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Mikepier wrote:

Look more closely at the features. Items such as programmable timers remote controls and such add to the price.
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productList&No=0&NeB94967294&category=Portable+Electric+Heaters&NB94942604
Kevin
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Supposedly the ceramic heaters put out more heat than glowing filament wire heaters. I havn't researched this.
For the $80 price difference, you can buy a $10 fan, and a lot of electricity.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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On Sat, 27 Sep 2008 10:10:34 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

You mentioned this just when I was thinking about these ceramic heaters. Seems about 10 years ago they were the big rage. Lots of advertising claimed they were superior and put out more heat than conventional heaters. Their small size was a selling factor too. Every hardware store and other stores that sold things like this, had one on display that was working in the colder seasons.
I was never convinced because I know that you only get a set amount of heat from a set amount of electricity. But lets answer this once and for all. Its got a ceramic core, but isnt there still a glowing wire inside that core? If not, how do they work?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

It does have some sort of resistance element in there to convert amps into heat. But the resistance element is part of the ceramic "core" which also contains many passages with air flowing through it. The heat from the resistor is conducted through the core to a large amount of surface area for transfer to the air. Because of this, no part of the heater core gets very hot. It might still be capable of burning your skin if you touched it directly, but there is nothing that glows, nothing hot enough to start most combustibles burning.
So it's no more efficient than any other resistance heater at converting electricity to heat. But the low temperature makes it safer than the glowing-wire heaters, and the heater core with lots of little air passages probably makes it easier to add a fan and direct all the warm air in a particular direction.
    Dave
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Mikepier wrote:

I beleive the 1500W refers to how much juice they use. As others have pointed out there are various ways to use that juice and / or distribute the heat. Suggest you google something like Differences in electric heaters. I just did and got a lot of hits:-))
Lou
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