Snowblower model number 6709

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Hello,
I got a snowblower with the house I bought recently. The snowblower is dusty, needs cleaning up, but I also wanted to find the manual for it on the web to make sure I check everything properly prior to starting it up this upcoming winter.
Unfortunately - there is not a single brand name on it. The only thing I can find is a plate with model number and serial number engraved into it.
It says that the model number is 6709
It is red (as most of them are). It is a single stage snowblower and it is big and somewhat heavy.
I think it is either Ariens, Toro or Craftsman
Does ANYONE have a snowblower with a little plate saying that model number is 6709?
I tried searching the net and the manuafacturers websites to no avail.
Anyone with a red snowblower - please, please take a look at the model number and let me know if you have a 6709 on it. It would help me a lot.
Thank you.
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djogon wrote: ...

Well, Deere are green for at least one other data point...

I'm quite sure if it were any of the "name" brands (even including Craftsman) it would have a brand ID on it so I'd not suspect any of those as being likely unless it is ancient and/or been repainted that has covered up manufacturer id.
Best I recall, Ariens is orange, Craftsman can be almost anything.
...

I'm guessing if it's such a no-name there won't be anybody claiming it proudly on the web anyway, but guess you'll not know unless you ask...
What about engine manufacturer/model/SN? That could be at least a clue as to who/what it _isn't_ ...
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I do not think it's a no-name judgiung by the guy who had it before me. The only issue is that is seems that the throtle handle got broken and that is where the plate with the name/model would have been. The plate is gone now.
Nothing on the engine - only the model # and serial #
I will post pictures alt you all know. Maybe someone will recognise it.
Thanks!
dpb wrote:

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djogon wrote:

Can you post a photo of it somewhere?
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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OK - here are the pictures
http://www.softwareriver.com/snowblower /
It will open a list of picture files - just click on any to open it. The first two are close-ups of the plate with model/sn on it. The rest are different angles and sides so that someone might identify it.
Can anyone identify it?
Jeff Wisnia wrote:

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It's old!

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wrote:

There is really no reason to identify that thing. It's probably 30, or maybe even 40+ years old. If you need more than a spark plug or a belt for it, it's toast. If it runs, use it. Change the oil, and grease whatever speaks, if it makes you feel better.
CWM
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Curisous ... what prompted you to think it is that old? There is a bit of dust on it as I did not get around to clean it, but what did in general prompt you to think that?
Change the oil? I thought this would be a 2-stroke engine??? Do you see an oil pan somewhere on this snowblower?
Thanks.
Charlie Morgan wrote:

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Also ... there are two big handles at the bottom. One marked with a big letter A in a circle and another one on the oposite side matked as B in a circle.
I have no idea what are these for. If I could find the manufacturer - I may be able to find a manual for it.
Handle marked (B) can be seen on this picture
http://www.softwareriver.com/snowblower/snowblower%20012.jpg
and here
http://www.softwareriver.com/snowblower/snowblower%20011.jpg
bottom right corner.
I think you can see both here
http://www.softwareriver.com/snowblower/snowblower%20010.jpg
What are these for?
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wrote:

Probably one of them puts one drive wheel in "neutral" to make turning easier. The other might be to engage and disengage the blower from the engine. In the old days, that would have been a feature so that you could clear a jammed chute without shutting off the engine. That would not be legal today for safety reasons.
I would recommend that you simply start the poor old thing up, and move those levers to find out what they do. I think it's pretty safe to say that finding a manual is not ever going to happen. It's a simple enough device, that you really don't need a manual anyway.
CWM
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wrote:

It's very obvious just by looking at it. That thing could very well be from the 1960's. It's A-N-C-I-E-N-T. Really. I'm not kidding.

That is a typical old 4-stroke horizontal shaft engine from a very long time ago. There is no doubt about it. They don't have a separate "pan" like an automobile engine. You will likely find a very short cylinder protruding up at an angle from the base of the motor crankcase casting somewhere. It will have a screw-in plug that has two pins sticking up that you can use to turn it by leveraging it with a screw driver, or else it will have a thumb-tab. That's where you fill the oil. You fill it to where it is almost coming out of that short filler tube. In rare cases, the oil sump and transmission on self-propelled blowers may be conjoined and the cap will have a dipstick built in to it, in which case you would use that to detemine when the oil is at the proper level.
To drain the oil, there will be a screw with a square head on it, also located on the side near the bottom. I just looked and you can see it in the picture "snowblower 012.jpg. It's at the bottom, below the carb.
CWM

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Thanks a lot Charlie - this is good advice. I will clean it up, change the oil and spark plug and just fire it up see if it runs.
I will figure out the levers by using them if the thing actually works. Had I known it was this old - I wouldn't have bought it from the previous home owner.
Thanks again .
Charlie Morgan wrote:

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wrote:

Good luck with it. Just bear in mind that that unit was built befiore the word "safety" was invented. Keep your apendages away from moving parts, and don't let your scarf tails fly free!
CWM
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It's a four stroke. Look for a square plug, at the base of the engine. I've worked on enough of these kind of thing.
I'm thinking an old Jacobsen, but I'm also probably mistaken.
No doubt in my mind, it's a four stroke.
For the oil fill, look for a plug about two inches up from the base. The plug will be about an inch diameter, made of plastic, and have two rods you can put a screw driver between the two small rods that stick up from the oil cap.
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Thanks EVERYONE - seriously good advice here. I will hopefully get this running. At least now I know what to look for - a great project for a few rainy weekends before the snow season starts ... :)
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Charlie Morgan wrote:

I agree...it definitely is quite old and if you did find out manufacturer they're not going to have anything on something that old anyway. The "IF YOU WRITE..." tag is telling of age -- that has 50's-vintage overtones to me, maybe 60's.
As for conjectures, I'd venture a very early Craftsman-like scenario of a supplier assembling pieces for a retailer or maybe a regional small-equipment manufacturer who decided to give snowblowers a shot for a winter product.
Only other shot at all would be to see if there are any identifying marks on castings, etc., but it's all for naught anyway except purely academic exercise.
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Aha ... " The "IF YOU WRITE..." tag is telling of age" - THANK YOU that makes a lot of sence actually now that I think about it.
This would be a 2-stroke machine most likely right? As someone suggested - I could grease it, change the spark plug and see if it runs. If it does I am good.
dpb wrote:

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I doubt very much if this is a 2 stroke engine, The absence of an "oil pan" tells me nothing. Most of these engines have a small sump in the bottom of the engine. Look for a drain plug somewhere in the bottom side. It looks like an old Briggs and Stratton to me. The "A" probably means augar. This engages and disengages the augar. Don't know what "B" means however there is usually a lever that acts as a clutch. It may mean brake. The external drive shaft for the augar and the lack of an impeller also dates that unit to somewhere in the mid 50's.

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Thanks John - I think that the concensus now is that this is a 4 stroke engine.
John Lawrence wrote:

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Have a look at this site. I'm sure that this guy could identify what you have. He even offers to feature old blowers on his site. http://home.gwi.net/~spectrum/snowhistory.html

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