Small battery backup?

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

The "principal" is your "pal" (not really, but for the sake of remembering)
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Echo! Echo!
--
Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

and "beliefs" contain "lie"s (spelling rule).
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

(blows razzberry) :^) Yes, I know. Finger memory- I'm no touch typist. If I have to proof everything I throw out here, I'll get even less done in real life.
-- aems ends....
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Well, mine was a bit of a prinic.
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Christopher A. Young
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Great link, thanks. You want to see a blank look. Ask someone younger than 20 or so to dial a number on one of these. Most kids simply don't know how.
Me, over 40, well, I learned on these. Anyone remember when the telco owned the phones, and you weren't allowed to move them around the house, or run another socket? I remember my family's first touch tone phone. That was so totally groovy, man. Like, far out!
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-snip-

My wife was just telling us the other day about her mom painting their phone to match the room. Back when Ma Bell was *the* telephone company- and you got a choice of wall or desk phone- in black.
Mom would paint the phone. Peeling paint would eventually get someplace it wasn't supposed to. The repairman would come out and give her a new phone. . . she'd paint it. . .the paint would peel. . .
We were on an 8 party line for a while. Our ring was 4 shorts. The hard-of-hearing old biddy down the street was 4 longs and she got a million calls a day. Today you could do 8 different 'ring tones' for all the parties.
Jim
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You hear about the old guy who was so, so poor. His hearing aid was on a party line.
I get to tell that one about every five years. Yes, I wear hearing aids. Have, since age 6.
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On Wed, 18 Nov 2009 06:53:52 -0500, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Ahh, I've got a 1940's-vintage 164:
http://www.telephonesuk.co.uk/images/164_Black.jpg
... but once I get it shipped over to this side of the Atlantic I expect I'm going to have to build some kind of box of tricks to hook it up to the US system (although I've not researched that in detail yet... maybe the US system can still "look" like a Strowger exchange as far as the phone's concerned and so is compatible enough)
I've got a 60's type 706 too, which looks almost identical to the repro ones in your link - that one I used to have hooked up in my house when I was living in England. Amazing how long it takes to dial a number compared to a more modern push-button phone!

There's no ringer in my 164 - it hails from the days where that was typically done separately. I do have a wooden wall-mount bell-box though, but the 164 lacks the necessary guts to drive it so I'd have to improvise there...
cheers
Jules
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On Wed, 18 Nov 2009 07:10:44 -0600, Jules

Those crazy brits- they put the numbers on the dial backwards.<g>

Yeah- but if the dial breaks, you can just flash with the plunger. try that with touch-tone. The little independent telco I worked for in the 70s had a test number set up so we could flash something like 111-2222 and if it went through we'd know it was a dial problem, not a line problem.

On this side of the pond all those boxes were white oak. What did they make them from over there?
Jim
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On Wed, 18 Nov 2009 08:33:57 -0500, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

They're the same, aren't they? Both US/UK turn clockwise, with digits 1-9 followed by zero. (I'm not sure what the reasoning was behind the UK's emergency services number being 999 as it takes so long to dial - even longer than 911 in the US)
Oh, brain fart on my part by the way - it's a 162 that I have, not a 164, although it looks identical to that one in the photo above (which I suspect is mislabeled, as apparently the 164 is just a handset, not an entire phone).

True. I think I have a spare dial for my 162, although not for the 706 (although the 706's were made in the millions, so I bet it's easy to get spares still).

It's stuff like that - all the little tricks and tips and "secret" things - that I find fascinating about old phone systems. I think US systems of old were perhaps more interesting in that regard, given the diversity...

Hmm, I'm not sure. IIRC it's a Bell 1a that I have:
http://www.britishtelephones.com/bell1a.htm
... but it's hard to tell from that what kind of wood it is just from the grain, and obviously it's stained with something or other and then varnished.
cheers
Jules
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Hmm- brain farts here, too, I guess. All that space on the right makes it look different.
-snip-

Neat old box. I can't remember ever seeing anything but light oak- but then I only worked for one rural telco- that had absorbed 2-3 others by 1972. When I got there in 72 we had not yet retired the operator from the last company.
Jim
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On Wed, 18 Nov 2009 12:27:05 -0500, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Yes, the dial on the WE phones does look to be rotated a little more than the UK ones I've seen - maybe that was common for all 'vintage' US dial phones?

The one I have's a bit beaten up, but then I bet it's pretty old (there's no indication of a date on it, and I've not found anywhere online which says when that style was made - but far as I know it was intended for use with the old "candlestick" style phones, and I think they'd been made obselete by the early '30s)
Incidentally, not sure where in the US folk can see a big old Strowger-type electromechanical exchance working? I bet there's one in a museum or two somewhere (I saw one in a museum out in New Zealand a few years ago and they're pretty fascinating to see and hear clicking away)
cheers
Jules
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wrote:

"You put your fingers in the holes and spin them around for awhile."
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On Sun, 15 Nov 2009 14:32:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That's when you're suffering from drug withdrawal.
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On Fri, 20 Nov 2009 06:47:20 -0800, Smitty Two wrote:

Hmm, you need a pressure switch fitted to the bed so power gets to the coffee machine soon as you get up ;-)
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Mary Carlson wrote:

I feel your pain! Do other households in the area have the same problem?
My worst problem used to be answering machines. With my last one, I had to hold a button while a voice counted through the days of the week, then to the right hour, then to the right minute. I'd stand around waiting, and if I missed the right hour or minute, I'd have to run through an additional 24 hours or 60 minutes.
Power failures don't affect my current phone clock. Perhaps it's powered by the battery in the handset. I still have to reset it for daylight time and for drifting, but it's quick, using the number pad and display.
I still have to reset the clock on my microwave. It would be hard to run it long on a battery because the display segments are lighted. However, it can be set in a jiffy. I do it at my convenience because the oven works fine without it.
I wonder why manufacturers don't advertise if a clock will keep running for a certain amount of time without power. To me, that's an important consideration. It should be easier than ever because clocks seem to need less power than before. I used to keep my 1996 computer plugged in because the clock could drain the battery before very long. I leave my 2006 computer unplugged 50 hours a week because I've never read that anyone needed to replace the battery in this model.
Nowadays, clock backups often use EDL capacitors because they have a longer service life than batteries. If a clock has a low-power display (LCD), that might be the way to go. The capacitor might need a series resistor so that when power came on, the charging surge wouldn't damage the power supply.
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Does "bachelor" equal "radical scofflaw"? I may qualify.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Fri, 20 Nov 2009 07:02:19 -0800, Smitty Two wrote:

Routines suck when they're someone else's.
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