Small 90° saw for tight space

The bottom edge of the frame for the dishwasher is about half an inch too tall, so it gets in the way of the door opening fully.
I need to cut a half-inch notch out of the bottom board about 2" from either side. There are two problems:
1. The board is recessed about 6" behind the front of the face, so it's tight getting in there.
2. The front of the dishwasher is right behind the board, so I can't use a utility saw, because I can't cut clear through.
It seems to me that I've seen a small power saw that is about the shape of a Dremel tool, but with the blade parallel to the length. But I can't find one. Is there such a beast? What is it called?
My other two thoughts are:
1. Dremel tool with some type of file or rasp and just file it down.
2. A sharp chisel and just chip it out.
Any better ideas?
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On 1/16/2015 8:50 PM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

You may be thinking of a multi-tool. They range from about $30 at Harbor Freight to about $200 for a Fein. You can pivot the blade on some.
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Can you get the board off, cut it, and put it back? Probably the preferred option.
They sell those oscillating tools now, that might do what you need, but I've never used one. I saw one used when our church was repairing a house for charity but it was super slow.
If you have the clearance to get to it, I think a Rotozip would do exactly what you need. Just set the depth so you don't hit what's behind it, and go slow.
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wrote:

Nope. It would be easier to remove the dishwasher. Then I could use a coping saw.

That's one I didn;t know about. I'll go look at those, too.
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Jennifer Murphy wrote:

Would something like this ebay item 251525624802 work ? Ir maybe a dremel type tool with a 1/8" end mill bit ? Tack a piece of wood along your cut line to guide the bit using the shank as a pilot .
--
Snag



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In wrote:

Seems like you have it figured out. I have one of those oscillating multi-tools that someone bought for me -- I forget which brand. I have to admit that I almost never use it for anything. I never thought that it cut very well and I almost always had another way to do what I wanted to do.
But, for what you want to do, that does seem like it would work. I saw these cheapo ones at Harbor Freight and that's probably what I would get for a once in a while job like the one you have: http://www.harborfreight.com/oscillating-multifunction-power-tool-68861-8493.html http://www.harborfreight.com/Multi-Tool-Blade-Set-3-Pc-61827.html
http://www.harborfreight.com/variable-speed-multifunction-power-tool-67537.html
I think the first one for $19.99 has not cutting blades. The second link is for 3 cutting blades for $8.99 , and the third link shows one for $39.99 that comes with a cutter and two other attachments.
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I think that is what I was thinking about, but I was hoping that the blade would be centered in the end of the tool, not off to the side. I'm not sure I can get the right angle with it that way. I'll to go the store and look at them.
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On 1/16/2015 9:03 PM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

Sounds like you're talking about the toe-kick area (the roughly 4" x 5" area between the floor and the bottom of the base cabinets/dishwasher)?
If so, forget the Roto-Zip, I have one and while it's handy, it's not the tool for this job.
Multi-tool is - unless I'm way off - is THE tool. For a one off job like this grab one at Harbor Freight get a couple of appropriate blades and you're done.
The blades for it that you want to use will be like a 1" - 1½" putty knife with teeth. It project straight out but can be adjusted to have the teeth up to 90 degrees off the centerline of the tool in smallish increments. That will allow you to get the blade perpendicular to the wood you're cutting whether at the top or bottom. Mark a line and cut carefully which is not difficult because these multi-tools offer the ultimate in control.
Hands down, it's one of the handiest tools I have in my (to hear my wife talk) VAST collection of power tools.
I have a Bosch cordless, variable speed and I'll NEVER be without one.
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On Fri, 16 Jan 2015 17:50:10 -0800, Jennifer Murphy
Even though I too have a dishwasher, I can't picture this, what I snipped.

The chisel seems like the best idea to me, if there's room to get it in there and hit it with a hammer.
If you can get the chisel to stand upright, how about chiseling from the front, a lot of thin pieces, and using needle nose to twist them off, since you can't saw or chisel where they are attached at the rear. Maybe aim for deeper than you need and settle for as deep as you need.

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wrote:

I can't use anything that goes clear through.
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On Fri, 16 Jan 2015 22:05:08 -0600, Unquestionably Confused

I saw pictures of those putty knife shaped blades. How do they work? Do they oscillate or vibrate?

I hope she's saying that in fun and not complaining. Otherwise, I'd remind her of that the next time something braaks and she doesn't have to call a handyman for $100-200. I sure wish I had someone with a vast collection of tools and the skills to use them so I don't have to. :-)

I'll go look at the local HW store later today.
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On 1/17/2015 3:09 AM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

Yes<g> They vibrate/oscillate laterally. Very minute travel. It will only cut when the workpiece is solid and held in place otherwise it just scuffs it. If it helps, it's like a Stryker saw that meds use to cut casts. Whips right through the plaster (or bone if you're doing a post on somebody's head<g>) but leaves the flesh intact.

She certainly appreciative of those tools and my skill set - as I am with her homemaking, parenting, cooking and, er, other talents<g>
When I installed a ceiling heater in my shop, it was she who asked when I was going to air condition it. I THOUGHT she was kidding but she wasn't - told me I spent enough time there in the summer that I should be comfortable year around.<g>

You'll have a much better idea of whether it will work in your particular application once you hold it in your hand and see how the blade(s) can be mounted.
Truly versatile. Kinda like the joke about the Milwaukee Sawz-All: "Hey, can I use this saw to...?" You sure can, it says saws ALL, not saws SOME!

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wrote:

My plan is to go check out the multi-tool. If that won't work, Plan B is a Dremel bit. Plan C is the chisel. My motto is never miss an opportunity to use a power tool. ;-)
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On 1/17/2015 3:10 AM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

[snip]

Remember the CONTROL you have with the multi-tool. If you know you want to cut only 5/8" into a 3/4" trim piece, just place a piece of masking tape on the blade. The tool will allow you to sneak up on the cutting depth and you can finish it off with a razor knife or...
If you buy a multi-tool, play around with it a bit to get a feel for how it works.
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On Fri, 16 Jan 2015 17:50:10 -0800, Jennifer Murphy

Many thanks to everyone. I ended up using a Dremel tool and a coarse rasp bit. It took about an hour of careful grinding, but now the door opens properly.
I went to Home Depot to look at multi-tools, but the cheapest one was almost $100, so I tried the Dremel first since I had it.
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