shade for air conditioner?

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We have the condensing unit of our AC system on the south side of the house (it was the most convenient place). It gets a lot of direct sun during the day, and I hear that your AC's efficiency can be reduced by 10% if the condensing unit is in the direct sun. Should I make a type of shade cover or something and attach it to the fence? The distance of the fence from the house is about 4 feet, and the fence is 6 feet high.
Howie
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| We have the condensing unit of our AC system on the south side of the house | (it was the most convenient place). It gets a lot of direct sun during the | day, and I hear that your AC's efficiency can be reduced by 10% if the | condensing unit is in the direct sun. Should I make a type of shade cover | or something and attach it to the fence? The distance of the fence from the | house is about 4 feet, and the fence is 6 feet high. | | Howie | This topic was completely beat to death here about a month ago so you might want to run for cover now.
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what was the title of the discussion?

cover
might
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| > | We have the condensing unit of our AC system on the south side of the | > house | > | (it was the most convenient place). It gets a lot of direct sun during | > the | > | day, and I hear that your AC's efficiency can be reduced by 10% if the | > | condensing unit is in the direct sun. Should I make a type of shade | cover | > | or something and attach it to the fence? The distance of the fence from | > the | > | house is about 4 feet, and the fence is 6 feet high. | > | | > | Howie | > | | > This topic was completely beat to death here about a month ago so you | might | > want to run for cover now. | > | > | I don't recall the exact wording. You could start here: http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&q=alt.home.repair%2Cair+conditioner+shade&btnG=Search or http://tinyurl.com/5syp5
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I read through the whole discussion (titled "shading exterior AC unit")... it's tough to conclude the answers to my questions!

the
the
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&q=alt.home.repair%2Cair+conditioner+shade&btnG=Search or

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wrote:

yeh,,true. In fact what I read was a total amount of codswallop with no regard for thermodynamics,,at all ! Shade your unit by all means but be sure of two things: 1. Do not block off or restrict the "air off" [air discharge] for at least 3metres(9feet) 2. Do not build a shade structure that allows the "air off" [air discharge] to recirculate back into the air on" path.
Equally you should take note of what direction your primary air comes from in the hotter months. It is important that the winjd does not oppose the forced air path of your unit.
Post more to get more :-)
BTZ
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It helps. So does trickling rainwater over the coil.
Nick
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On 20 Jul 2004 07:05:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

bullshit alert !!
never ever do this !
BTZ
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Why not, little worm?
Nick
Ref: D. Y. Goswami
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wrote:

I won't do it because rainwater does contain minerals. Ever heard of Acid rain? That may be pH related, but rainwater does contain minerals.
Do it if you want, but the stuff will build up and clog the coil over a few years....
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As in "distilled water contains minerals"? :-)
Nick
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wrote:

as in, as the rain falls, it picks up pollutants from the atmosphere.
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Would you care to name these rainwater minerals? :-)
Nick
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wrote:

I would not be worried about the minerals, as I would be nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxides, and the carbon dioxide and goodies it picks up as it falls... Thats just what I want on my aluminum coils....acid.... I mean...obviously you have never seen a coil where a dog likes to piss on it...
Water on the coils screws up the charge balance, and while it SEEMS like a good idea, IF you want a water source AC, go geothermal...
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...since they don't exist :-)

Haven't seen anything like that in several years, with a few limestone rocks in my rainwater tank. We only need AC for a few weeks per year in Phila. In Arizona, continuous sprinkling for years degraded a fin-tube connection in one system, galvanically. Nothing to do with minerals, but a concern, after 50K(?) hours of use.

That's a lot more expensive. Professor D. Y. Goswami in Gainesville measured a 22% increase in COP by swamp cooling an outdoor coil. Rainwater trickling is cheaper and seems to do better, by cooling the coil directly instead of the air surrounding it. My $10 10 watt fountain pump reduces my window AC power consumption from 1050 to 950 W (including the pump) and lowers the cold air outlet temp by 10 F.
Nick
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wrote:

Depending on the part of the country you are in..they do. I would have to go pull up some info on that...but I know its been hashed to death at some dealer meetings...

aluminum
dog
rocks
In
one
50K(?)
I replaced about 100 fairly new units out in the desert that were shot in under 5 years due to that. I have replaced more than that due to mineral loading on the coil back when a POS device called "The AC Buddy" was designedand sold out that way. It was basically a set of large misting nozzles, with a trim ring that went around the top of the unit, and connected to the local water supply... Ruined a unit in short order..short like in some cases under a year.

a
measured
trickling
the
power
air
There is a guy down south that has a pad that goes around the coil, and uses the same principle. He has declined to supply any 3rd party testing, or, to allow any 3rd party testing. If you ask most AC builders, you will find that damage to other parts, with an improper set up can happen as well. The biggest issue is flooding the compressor after you drop the pressures, and dont have the charge adjusted, and you freeze the evap..and yes..seen that a few times as well...
Something like you advocate, while a good idea in theory, may allow on a large scale more issues than it helps.

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Sedona? :-) Very mysterious.

Maybe that AZ system had Al fins on Cu tubing, vs Al on Al for my AC. I just measured the tank pH... between neutral and "weakly acid" (6) on Fischer Alkacid Test Paper ("Successor to litmus paper.") Hard to read, between orange (neutral) and "slightly brownish orange."

...100 people RAINwatered their coils in the desert?

A "local water" heater in Phoenix might last 5 years...

With local vs rainwater...

Cooling the air vs the coil, a la Goswami?

Haven't seen that.

Anything's possible.
Nick
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wrote:

if you bubble co2 through water, you produce carbonic acid. if you bubble sulfur dioxide through water, you produce sulfuric acid. both of those are pollutants, but it depends upon where you are in the world as to how much is available. there's not too many places in the world that doesn't have some sort of air pollution that is picked up by rain.
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But they are not minerals.
Nick
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wrote:

NO! Rain water collects dust and minerals from the air. If you ever washed a dark colored car and forgot to move it out of the rain, there would be dust spots all over. John
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