self built carport?

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On Wed, 29 Apr 2015 17:45:30 -0700 (PDT), John G

from many sources.
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On Wed, 29 Apr 2015 21:52:49 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The url that was posted
http://gardenplansfree.com/storage/carport-plans-free/
shows bracing parallel to the length, but none across the width. It shows the same thing in 7 sketches. Makes me doublt the whole url.
Unless I missed it, doesn't say how deep the posts should go either. Depth is probably more important than concrete.
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Mike,

If you're putting posts in the ground, you would be building something more like a pole barn. Around here our local building department has plans for free and does not require a building permit for them. Since the wood contacts the soil they are not considered permanent structures (eventually the posts will rot, even if pressure treated).
Normally, a carport would begin with a concrete slab, then the structure would be built on top of the slad. The slab would be typically be a monolithic pour with deepened footings on the perimeter to support the posts/walls. However, in areas with deep frost lines, it may be easier to pour separate footings first, then pour the slab later.

In the simplest of terms, you will need a post base at the bottom of each post. This ties the post to the slab/foundation and elevates the post to prevent moisture from wicking up.
Then you'll need a column cap at the top of each post. This secures the beam to the post, as well as giving you a way to tie two beam segments over a single post.
You'll also need rafter ties at each rafter/truss to tie the roof to the beams.
Remember, an open carport can have a lot of wind pressure blowing from underneath. You don't want the roof to blow off in strong winds, so everything will need to be tied together, from the foundation all the way up to the roof.
I did not take the time to calculate any loads to determine what beam sizes you'll need.

Prefabricated roof trusses would probably be cheapest and easiest for a structure of that size.
You'll also need to brace the structure, typically with diagonal braces or solid plywood at the corners, to prevent the structure from racking.

In most areas, if you are not building the structure for your own use, you will need to be licensed and insured as a contractor. In other words, if the structure falls and damages your own cars, that's your problem. If you build a structure for someone else and it collapses, you could be responsible for the damage and injuries.
You might compare the costs of building a garage instead of a carport. In some ways it will be easier to build, and it would be much more useful than a carport (storage, weather protection, workshop, etc.).
Most of all, study, study, study before you start anything!
Good luck,
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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wrote:

22 foot span definitely will need center posts, unle3ss you buy trusses made to support a 22 foot span. And try to buy 22 foor 2x8s. Most places only sell up to 16', but a real lumber yard may have up to 20' and will be costly. 22' is really pushing the limit. You'll need 12' joined in the center. (cut to 11').
A building that size should have 6x6 posts, not 4x4s.
I suggest you get some pre-made plans and follow them, since you seem to not know how to build something like that.
Personally, if you're gonna build something that big, I'd make it a garage. Carports still drift full of snow in winter, and most "carports" are just small roofed, open sided sheds big enough for one vehicle. And why 26' long? Most cars and pickup trucks are not over 16' long.
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On Thursday, April 30, 2015 at 11:28:07 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

or buy a steel carport kit and assemble it......
a friend had 2 vehicles in his carport when we had a bad snow.
that resulted in a scrapper coming to tow away the 2 totaled vehicles, and the failed carport/
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