self built carport?

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I'm interested in build a carport as practice for building two porches. The home owner states that the carport is to be about 22' wide and 26' long. Big enough for a Toyota Rav4 and a Chevy Express 2500 van.
I understand putting posts in the ground to support the structure at the corners. Because of the lengths of the respective sides, do I also needs posts in the middle of each side to support 2"x8" lumber? That would make eight posts in all of 4"x4" pressure treated lumber. If I do add a post in the middle of each side, how do I join (or do I) the joists at the center post?
I plan to make a simple gable with 1"x4" purloins for corrugated roofing. All the lumber where possible should be pressure treated.
There will be no electricity or other grid services in this carport. Just a place to put a car out of the weather.
Other than my massive inexperience with this, what else should I consider and research?
TIA
Mike
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In most places, any permanent structure requires a building permit.
In many places, local colleges provide classes in house-building methods (both masonry and wood.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On 04/29/2015 06:25 PM, Mike wrote:

Though hardly rocket science, not quite as simple as just putting up a few posts. Be sure you understand the concept of triangulation.
Simple example here
http://gardenplansfree.com/storage/carport-plans-free/
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Great resource. Thank you.
Mike
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On 04/29/2015 06:52 PM, Mike wrote:

Hope your project goes well.
I have no garage or car port here.
Have to deal with snow and ice in the winter.
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One of my beter moves was to get a house with a garage. Never knew how good it was to go to the car in the winter and not have to scrape the ice off the windows and get the groceries out of the car when it was raining. This is in NC where we don't have that much snow and ice either.
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On 04/29/2015 09:02 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I live in Wisconsin and there is plenty of snow and ice.
I finally figured out that the only way to deal with clearing the windshield is to simply go out, start the car and turn on the defroster full blast.
Then do the shoveling and by the time I'm done, the windows are all clear.
Now that I'm retired nothing has got to be done in a hurry.
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On 04/29/2015 07:43 PM, philo wrote:

Bwahahahahahhhaaaaaaaaa! That carport wouldn't last a year where I live.
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On Wednesday, April 29, 2015 at 7:26:52 PM UTC-4, Mike wrote:

A important question.......
does it snow heavily where you are? how about hurricanes and or tornadoes?
building this may make you responsible for any damages to vehicles under it.
some friends had both of their vehicles totaled when heavy snow collapsed their steel carport.
over build it for the bad day
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wrote:

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On 04/29/2015 08:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: X
<snip>

overkill
a /single/ 4x4 can support several tons
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easily. The 6X6 is significantly stronger The end to end rigidity isn't hard - you can triangulate, but the wind loading is higher in the crosswize direction due to roof area, and you can't triangulate as well and still have opening for entry/egress.
The only carports I've ever seen with 4X4 posts were fastened to the side of a building or had more structure than just posts. (like a "cube" shed at one end.. They also have a well cross-braced roof framework -
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On 04/29/2015 09:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

There were some sketchy carports in San Antonio, TX. Then they had one of those freak snowfalls and the all fell down. I haven't been following the thread but is the OP designing for snow?
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wrote:

the next county.
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On 04/30/2015 10:40 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I had one of those microbursts disassemble my polymer shed last summer. It was a pain in the ass finding the pieces and putting it back together. Of course, it was raining too, so anything in a cardboard box was soaked.
The shed 8' away that had been getting ready to collapse for the last 20 years was fine.
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On 04/29/2015 10:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I always say it's best to err on the side of caution.
Also as mentioned below snow could be a factor.
that said, it looks like the OP with the extension of ".cx" on his post...is in Christmas Island.
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On Wed, 29 Apr 2015 23:16:42 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I agree with the 6x6s. I built a shed for horses. It was 30 ft long and 12 ft. wide. It was split into 3 parts, (11 ft one each end, and 8 ft in the middle.) The 11 x12 ends were open on one side so the horses could go in an out as they pleased. The middle 8 x 12 section was closed on all sides with a door and was intended for saddles ropes buckets, and other horse tack and supplies.
I used 4x4 posts (eight of them). I had just finished it, and just put on the door in the middle. All that had to be done was put some shelves in that middle section, and the horses were already using the ends. That night there was a very severe storm. Five of the 4x4's snapped off the other three pulled out of the freshly packed soil (no concrete was used). The entire building lannded upside-down, about 40 feet away, which also ripped down at least 100 feet of fencing that was attached to the shed. Because I built it strong, the entire structure stayed together, leaving a complete building laying on it's roof. but with 5 posts broken off, much of the pole barn metal torn and/or badly dented, mangled fencing everywhere, and several horses injured, but luckily none were injured real badly. All horses were loose, the stallion was running with the mares, but he was so scared that he did not breed any of them. (He was the one hurt the worst too). They just huddled together for security, in the yard, and under some trees.
The weather bureau claimed it was probably an isolated small (skipping) tornado, but they were not able to prove it it was a tornado or not. Our house (100 ft away and several neighboring buildings, had shingled ripped off parts of the roof, some broken windows and other damages. Two farms away there was no damage. But about a mile away , and several more miles there were similar damages. (Thus the skipping).
My point is this: If I had used 6x6's, and put concrete around the posts, I think it would have stayed intact. Of course I'll never really know...... But with those open sides, and the wind came from that direction, it just became like a plastic bag, where the wind blows into the end and carrys it away. If it was not for a sturdy metal kids swing set which appeared to stop it, the whole shed may have crashed into the house.
BTW: It took a crane to upright it and get it back to where it belonged. Plus new posts and much of the metal on the roof had to be replaced.
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On 04/30/2015 11:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

If it was a tornado, I doubt if even 6 x 6's would have stood up.
Reminds me of the time my friend built a 2x4 stall for his (immature) bull, then ask me to help him shove pills in it's mouth.
It ran through the stall like it was made of paper.
Next week he conned me into helping him again and made the stall out of 4x4's and it looked damn sturdy to me.
No problem, the bull just kicked out the side of the barn and left the scene.
I did not bother to help my friend again.
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Usually when a permanent structure is built, plans need to be submitted to the town for approval and permits need to be issued. Since you have no ide a what to do, I would suggest that you hire an architect to draw your plans for the town. You can build from the plans as the items that you asked ab out will be specified on the plans.
John Grabowski http://www. MrElectrician.TV
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