Safely removing a gutter over service drops


I have a house where the Electric, cable and phone drops come in under the overhang in the same area. The gutter is full of roof granules, leaves and God knows what else and is weighty. The gutter also leaks and needs to be replaced. I want to safely remove it without taking out any incoming wires.
I figure taking out a 3 foot section over the wire entrances before removing the entire thing is the safest approach. I would prefer not to extensively damage the fascia board. My problem is further compounded by the fact I will need to be directing my son as to what to do from the ground since I can not climb that high any more. His skill level with the various tools will not match yours or mine.
I own most of the toys so my real question is what tool or tools would you use to cut a 40 foot gutter into a 10, 3 and 27 sections while it is mounted to the fascia while doing minimal damage to the remaining structure and how would you do it?
Please don't suggest doing it from the roof, we are both round, ground squirrels. -:) (grin)
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Colbyt wrote:

Old thick stick gutter, or modern beer-can roll-form? Need a real saw for the thick stuff, but a pair of snips and a multi-tool will handle the thin kind. Pound a wood shingle up from below the gutter to avoid scarring the fascia board. Be advised that your power company and your insurance agent would rather you did not DIY in this case. It is really a two or more man job, replacing gutters from ladders. Around a power drop, scaffold would be preferable. Fiberglass ladders, of course. Is the gutter on clips, or fastened directly? The old kind on clips, you can sometimes slide sideways.
Pictures would help....
I'd call your power company just for giggles anyway. I haven't seen a drop like that go in since the 60's. They may be willing to do a cheap refresh just as preventative maintenance. Summer is often their slow time, and they would rather replace a drop now than in January when an ice storm takes it down.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Colbyt wrote:

I used an angle grinder with a cutoff wheel when I did mine last year. Worked fine.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As John mentioned, an angle grinder would work well, but if you're or your son are not comfortable with him up on a ladder with power tools, a hacksaw would work fine for a couple of cuts. You only have to cut some relief cuts to allow the gutter to flex some, then you can finish up the cuts with metal shears. That's the safest way.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Colbyt wrote:

The safest way is to call the utility and have them disconnect the line.
Most electric providers do this dirt cheap to avoid the liability of electrocuted customers who were tree trimming and doing projects such as yours.
My electric company charges $20 to take the wire down and put it back up when you're done.
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I'm filtering all Google Groups posters.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here in Maine the Power Company will wrap the wires in a thick rubber sleeve for free and remove it when you're done...CALL YOUR POWER COMPANY....HTH...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
benick wrote:

Learn something on here every day- service drop condoms. Never heard of such a thing. I'd have to see one loose, and installed, before I would trust my life to it, but it is an interesting concept. On a real old drop, the kind with 3 distinct wires going to 3 distinct ceramic standoffs on the side of the house, I've often seen shiny spots on all 3 wires, where the 50 YO insulation has fallen off due to weather. Really don't want THOSE touching. If the drop is over 30 YO or so, I'd use the work as an excuse to sweet-talk the power company into a fresh drop rated for 200 amp, even if I had to spring for a roof penetration getting sealed up. Tell them a service panel upgrade is on the planned project list 'next year'. Most power companies will do their part very cheaply, and refer you to a electrician who can change out the meter base and install the weather head.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"service drop condoms.." LOL .. Good one... For "most" drops since atleast 1960 they work well..I have used them...You just need to think ahead because the P C won't just drop everything and come and install it just because you felt like painting or replacing gutters this weekend...It takes a week and it's there as long as you need it.......I agree on drops that old being on the top of ANY "to do" list...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are some good suggestions above, but for sometime in the future, consider replacing your overhead service with underground. Some of the advantages are 1) ice storms and other weather disasters don't affect it 2) no interference by vegetation, trees, whatever 3) service wiring is much heftier than overhead drops so future increases in your household appliance or shop requirements are easily handled 4) for the neatniks among us, it looks much nicer. The downside is the higher cost, since your power company will likely not do the trenching or supply any conduit except what goes up the pole to the transformer. I have had underground service in commercial buildings and houses for many years and would never use anything else. YMMV.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.