Rusty Tool Stand

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wrote:

I bought a Craftsman, probably near you in SE Las Vegas for $15 the other day. It was even still full of sand.
Steve
www.heartsurgerysurvivalguide.com
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snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com (Arthur Shapiro) wrote in NEWS.TR.UNISYS.COM:

Sandblasting, until all the iron is looking grey. Then treat it to primer and the kind of paint used for cars. Then it will last quite some years.
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On 2/15/2012 3:29 PM, Arthur Shapiro wrote:

sandblast and powder coat
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Steve Barker
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On 02/15/2012 04:29 PM, Arthur Shapiro wrote:

would the parts be small enough to do something like this with a Rubbermaid storage container?
http://www.stovebolt.com/techtips/rust/electrolytic_derusting.htm
Lazy man's way to restore steel/iron parts.
nate
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On Feb 15, 4:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com (Arthur Shapiro) wrote:

There are businesses around that can dip a whole car and remove the rust in chemicals. They also do furniture. Check the yellow pages or google. I had the bed of an antique firetruck dipped to remove all the rust about 20 years ago. Worked great and looks good even today. No damage like you would get from sandblasting.
Hank
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On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 12:35:54 -0500, "Robert Green"

The patina will be gone. Why is it that rust gets no respect?
--Vic
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Why are you brain dead?
nb
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On 02/16/2012 01:11 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

'cause it never sleeps. What may be a charming patina one day can be holes the next. Was just looking at my grandfather's old pickup truck with my dad the other day - we'd "restored" it together maybe 15 years ago; now he took the bed off again to replace the wood (I just made the new floor from pine the last time because of budgetary concerns, he's redoing it with red oak) and finds that three of four spring hangers are rusted through. Screw patina, for something you're going to use, nothing beats a nice coat of paint.
nate
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<...snipped...>

Nate, red oak probably won't last as long as the pine did without paint or some kind of treatment. WHITE oak is what you want, it is fairly rot resistant and will last a long time treated or not. Many or most original wooden truck beds used white oak. A laminated form is still used today for dry van and cargo box flooring. The laminated product is not recommended for exposed applications like flatbeds or pickup bodies, you need solid planking for that. Most exposed applications today use hardwoods imported from South America or Asia. Be careful if you choose pressure treated lumber, some of the compounds being used today will accelerate corrosion of regular steel.
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On Feb 15, 4:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com (Arthur Shapiro) wrote:

I bought mine rusty 20 years ago and it still is rusty . I knocked of the worst with a wire brush and rubbed it down in motor oil. The rust soaks up the oil and creates a coating that prevents more rust. Gives it character.
Jimmie
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wrote:

The fish oil is Rustoleum can also be a bit of a problem...
When I was heavy into the Soap Box Derby world, we'd often race our cars "in primer" while we were still fiddling with the bodies, The final fancy paint job was saved until we were sure that we were done with all bondo, fiberglass, etc. We'd often throw a quick coat of primer on before a weekend race so that our competitors couldn't tell what we'd done - no sense giving away our design secrets.
Anyway, a friend of mine grabbed a few cans of Rustoleum primer and blasted a coat over a large portion of the car. A few weeks later he took it to a auto paint shop to have it painted and the guy said he couldn't get the paint to stick. He'd spray it on and it just woudn't dry properly. He asked my friend what type of primer he had used.
When my friend told him that he had used Rustoleum primer, the guy said that it would take some major work to get any other paint to adhere because of the fish oil in the Rustoleum. My friend was in a time crunch, so he went and bought a couple of cases of Rustoleum paint and spray painted the car. He did such a fine job that people were amazed when he told them that he painted it in his garage with spray paint.
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A picture would say a lot. Not posted here, but a link. Is it something that would hold up to sandblasting or small enough pieces to get into a bead blaster? Those things do incredible work without taking off a lot of metal or leaving marks. And much quicker than wire wheeling it. And safer, too.
Steve
www.heartsurgerysurvivalguide.com
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If it is like most of the vintage tools I have seen, it has lots of nooks and crannies that are nearly impossible to effectively clean with even a power grinder brush. Do it once, do it right. Or don't mess with it, because you will be doing it again in the near future.
Steve
www.heartsurgerysurvivalguide.com
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I'm the OP.
Yeah - it's not a very "even" underside - I didn't think it necessary to mention that having at it with a wire brush in a drill will be difficult. I could post a picture as you suggested, but think I have enough options now to deal with it (or to do nothing). It looks like any other small pedestal bench grinding stand.
I'm willing to throw a few bucks at it, so maybe I'll price out beadblasting at the local powdercoating establishment. I'm not about to purchase a sandblaster, even used; much as having lots of tools rubs me the right way, like most folks here, that might be a little overboard.
Art
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snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com (Arthur Shapiro) wrote in wrote:

try RENTING a sandblaster.
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Jim Yanik
jyanik
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wrote:

A man can never have too many tools. There has been many a time when I could have used a sand blaster or bead blaster cabinet. I just got a small sandblaster the other day at a yard sale. $15. I am anxious to use it and see how it does. When you need one, there is little to substitute for it, and you get professional results.
Steve
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