Roofing shingle questions ?


I am going to be re-roofing a small shed. I plan to use the GAF Grand Timberline 50 year architectural shingle. I have several questions:
I have read that I should use a "starter" course along the eaves and rakes of the roof. But, the book that I am reading says that this starter course should be a 3-tab type shingle. Why is this ??
I don't see a 3-tab shingle at the GAF website that comes in the same color as the architectural shingle that I would like to buy. (I guess it doesn't matter much if the starter rows would all be covered up anyhow ??)
I have thought of using the rubberized WeatherGuard instead of felt. Is this better than paper felt? Although I think it would be quite expensive for a house, just 1 roll would do for my shed.
Should I order 1 1/2 nails for these architectural (50 yr) shingles ??
What size nails would I get to lay down the WeatherGuard ?? Would it be the same type nail as the nails for the shingles ??
Thank you very much !!
--James--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James wrote:

I am thinking of using another brand, and they also say use 3-tab on the start, but since it is covered, as you say, you could use any color.
Here's their installation instructions if you care.
http://www.malarkeyroofing.com/PDFFiles/LamShingleInstallinstruct%200205.pdf
For a small shed, though, I really think you are doing overkill with a 50-year singe and then using weathershield....of course it's your $$$. I just roll roof my shed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James wrote:

Most manufacturers recommend a running a starter at the eaves and the rakes though I would venture to guess 90% of the roofs installed today only use starter at the eaves. Its your call.
The best practice is to use a three tab shingle for the starter after having cut the tabs off. This allows you to slide the shingle down to the edge of the eave getting the glue strip very close to the edge of the roof. Many roofers simply flip a three tab shingle upside down for the starter. This puts the starter glue strip 5" up from the eave. When you cut the tabs off you have a very secure double glue strip at the eave giving you the best defense against wind.

you usually use a color close to the shingle color. Many architectural shingles use three tabs for hip and ridge so this is what is used for starter. If your shingles dont come in a three tab just pick a similar color, or black, for the starter.

It is not needed unless the shed is very low pitch (< 4/12). It doesnt make any sense to use it over felt especially if the shed is not heated. Dont waste your money.

1 1/4" nails would be fine if its laid directly on the sheathing.

None, the weatherguard is not necessary. #15 felt and staples will do you fine.

Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A 3 tab shingle will expose the felt where the 3 small cut-outs are in the shingles, thus the need for a starter course. Get a flat shingle otherwise the first course will not lay right. Starter course color doesn't matter since it is almost 100% covered. Shop the other manufacturers for a color match since you will want flat shingles on the ridge.
Felt is fine for a shed.
Roofing nails 1 1/2" are OK. The nails with the orange plastic caps are for putting down the felt. Use plenty of nails on the felt on a steep pitch.
Steve.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James wrote:

If the additonal expense doesn't bother you then I say go ahead.

That stuff is self- adhesive and requires no nails. You just peel off the backing and it sticks to the deck like glue. This is one of the big advantages of the material.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The many answers have been SO helpful , and directly answer my questions. I have printed all of the replies and will keep them for my notes.
I guess the 50 yr shingle and using WeatherGuard is indeed overkill. But, I have had this shed for 20 yrs , and it looks nearly as good as the day I had it built. I plan to live another 39 years, so I just want to keep it in # 1 shape. The cost difference for the entire roof would likely be less than $100.
Thanks again for the real nice replies, and I welcome any other comments !!!
--James--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James wrote:

Good question. That's a dated method. Most manufacturer's make a roll of starter strip that is around 35' long. There's no need to cut off the tabs and throw material away and there's no gap along the roof edge.
GAF is one of the few that doesn't appear to sell the stuff in rolls. Instead they have individual starter shingles: http://www.gaf.com/Content/Documents/20214.pdf
I would go with the roll starter strip, even if it means getting another manufacturer's product, as it's faster and there is _no_ advantage in having seams where you don't need or want them.

All covered up, no problem with color.

Probably not necessary unless it's a very low pitched roof.

1 1/2" is pretty standard if you have plywood sheathing. The tip of the nail should penetrate the sheathing completely and project about 3/8" on the underside.

Staples, or you can use the same nails. No need to complicate matters with different size nails - not much difference.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So why do they use these plastic cap nails for felt?
    http://www.simplexnails.com/PlexCapDataSheet.html
I had never seen them used till I saw pro roofers doing roofs in the south. I always saw and used just staples myself. You see the roofers in the northeast with one of those swing staplers and it goes fast.
Those plastic cap ones, with the volume a roofer uses, must tap into profits and probably take a lot longer to put in.
Once the shingles are on, the shingles and nails hold everything down anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Al Bundy wrote:

Regional differences are curious. In New England furring the ceiling, aka strapping, is standard operating procedure. It's rarely done in other areas. That's an even bigger time/money sink and with similarly small return on investment.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

That's a traditional method that uses the materials on hand. But you can buy special purpose starter course at any Home Depot, or whatever. It comes in rolls, pre-cut to the correct width. It has adhesive on the downside to stick it to the roof, and an additional adhesive strip on the top to hold down the first course of shingles. That's why you use the cut shingles in the first place, their adhesive strips help hold down the edge of the first course.
Dennis
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

For the starter course the architectural shingle you will be using is to thick and has variable thickness and will not allow the shingle over it to lay flat and seal

Get one that is close. You will not see it anyway

No opinion.

No opinion. The manufacturers instructions should give you a clue.

Same as above

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

old off and put back new?
If you are going over the old shingle the 50 yeare shingle is over kill.

other than the gable ends. I use them on the gable ends so that my finish product look and is straight. Cutting shingles straight can be a trying job when looking for perfection.

and over hang.

consider ventilation. As for the requirements, 1 sq ft of ventilation for 300 sq ft of attic space is required. If your over hang of the garage has vinyl vented soffit and between your rafters you have baffles so air can come through then you should be fine, also a ridge vent must be installed. Ventilation is the key to shingle life.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.