Roof with three layers of shingles - dangerous?

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In many locations, the presumption is that these are issues/questions that the buyer is expected to resolve at or before closing. After the sale is complete, you don't necessarily get to retroactively address these issues.
If you read my post, I said IF:
1 - It was recently re-roofed
2 - Code says 3 layers are not allowed
3 - A building permit was required, but not pulled.
Then you have a good case.
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Ben,
Shingles have weight. Each layer of shingles puts weight on your roof structure. This structure must support this weight and the weight of other things (snow and ice come to mind). 3 layers of shingles may be too much weight for your roof structure.I 'd be concerned about the roof collapsing. I'd really worry come Winter.
Dave M.
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In addition to what the others have said, I'd pay a visit to whoever did the home inspection and kick him in the teeth. Then get your money back.
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inspection and pronounce it good or bad and if the top layer looks good, he would not do any in depth inspecting.
As for the number of layers, there are probably tens of thousands of houses with three layers. There is the potential for problems, but I'd not act too quickly. If it has been on there for 10 years, I'd do nothing until it was time to re-roof. Not knowing the construction, none of us can say if there is serious danger from the weight. Pitch, snow load, type of rafter or truss, etc. all play a part. Just look at the weight of the older slate roofs.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote: ...

Slate roofs were certainly not placed on stick-framed houses only sized for asphalt...that's totally unrelated to the OP's situation.
I agree it's highly unlikely if it's been there any length of time there's going to be a problem tomorrow.
While weight can be a consdieration, the primary proscription on the third layer is it tends to shorten life of the new shingles from additional heat and poor conditions underneath.
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On Mon, 23 Jun 2008 10:31:10 -0500, dpb wrote:

Also, when it it time for a new roof, the roofers will charge a lot more for the tear off and haul away of a three layer roof.
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Tony Sivori
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As others have said, 3 layers is not a good idea and it does not meet most local codes. On the other hand, older homes often do turn out to have 3 layers because someone went ahead and added a 3rd layer without doing the tear-off that should have been done first. If you had a home inspection done before the purchase, that definitely would have given you the info on the status of the roof. As far as trying to go back now and stick it to the seller, that's doubtful at this point. The fact that you were now able to discover the status of the roof by checking on your own means you could have done the same thing before you bought the property.
If you don't see any evidence of sagging, and the roof seems to be in good shape and is not leaking, you may not need to do anything. If you are getting close to needing a new roof anyway, it would probably make sense to go ahead and get estimates and have it done now before this coming winter.
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"LJP" wrote

Keep in mind that he may be south of the snow-line and if so, 3 layers is allowed. We don't have the snow weight issues.
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Ben wrote:

Before doing anything else, confirm that you DO have three layers of shingles.
It sounds like you don't have much experience examining roofs (and there's nothing wrong with that ;) ) so get a roofer or other knowledgeable pro out to confirm. THEN decide what, if anything, you should expect from, or need to do to, your roof.
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1) Please don't say you are in ME, NH, VT or Buffalo.
2) Wear a hardhat in the attic.
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Maybe even in the basement. :)
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wrote:
:I moved into my house not too long ago and had the first occasion to :want to go up to the roof yesterday. It looks like there are three :layers of shingles. I've read that you should never have more than :two layers of shingles because of the weight. How much should I worry :about this? : :Thanks for your input, :-Ben
My understanding is that 3 layers is maximum, i.e. if a roof with 3 layers needs reroofing, a complete tearoff is the first step. This is what happened when my roof was redone around 3 years ago. Judging from this thread, many if not most areas now require no more than 2 layers. As noted, make sure about your assessment of how many layers are on there.
Dan
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