Replacing a cracked window

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I'm guessing a bird flew into one of our windows and cracked the outer pane.
There are strips around the perimeter of the glass. Do I simply pry those strips off to get the glass out?
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Mitch@_._ writes:

Double pane?
Find the name of the manufacturer. I had one break and found out the glass was lifetime guaranteed. They wanted money to install it though, I did that myself.
First advice: wear gloves and be careful.
With mine, I used a flat knife to break the seals and pulled the strips out.
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I'm almost positive it's Anderson. My father-in-law built the house, and I'm pretty sure that's all he uses. But we don't speak any more, so I'll have to check it out.
I actually called a "window expert" called Superior Exteriors. The owner of the company came out to look at it, and said it's impossible to repair or replace (it's custom, so it's stained wood to match all the other trim). You believe that? It's impossible to fix a window. So what? Demolish the house?
He said there are usually strips to pull off and access the glass. Then he left. I looked again and the strips are there in plain sight, on the outside of the window.
Window expert.
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Window experts are in the business of selling windows ;-)
Call a glass expert! A good local glass company should be able to handle the job quickly, safely, and inexpensively.
I've had several window panels replaced due to failed seals. My friendly local glass company came and measured/quoted. A few days later they brought new glass units and installed them -- took 15 mins each.
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Okay, I called a glass company and the guy said it's really easy if I just bring the window in. When I told him there's no way to remove the window, he said he'd come out later and look at it.
He thought there should be release catches, but there aren't. The window itself is wood, and the sash is vinyl. All I can see is that you'd have to unscrew the vinyl sash from the frame.
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On Feb 9, 1:34pm, Mitch@_._ wrote:

If they are andersen like you said before, the ones I've worked on you have to remove the vinyl track from one side of the frame and then the sashes can come out. It's a bit of a PITA. I've had to do this on several windows in my house to replace rotted sashes and/or nonfunctional counterbalances.
here's an old thread where someone posted good instructions at least for my particular windows:
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.home.repair/browse_frm/thread/2ee8486e094a39ed/be2c6a196eaf70a8 ?
HTH
nate
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Thanks for that. Sounds like exactly what I have: screws on left side only.
Either way, I'll have to wait until warm weather. Our house is for sale. I'll have to put a note on the window to let people know we intend to fix it.
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Glass guy came out. It's going to cost $135 total, including labor. Much less than I thought it would be.
I didn't realize that the whole double-pane "module" is a sealed unit. I was under the impression that you pop out the broken pane and pop in a new one.
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Mitch@_._ writes:

It varies.
Mine was a garden window. The side panes are removable by pulling the strips. The crank out pane is one unit.
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On Mon, 09 Feb 2009 15:24:00 -0600, Mitch@_._ wrote:

That is a decent price for my area. Tempered dual pane would certainly cost more. Is this a real glass shop; meaning, they cut and build the panes on site?

Sealed with hot butyl caulk, iirc.
Glass work can get one cut real fast. Always have on heavy gloves as a DIY.
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No. It's Argon-filled, so they order the whole unit, and install it onsite.
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On Mon, 09 Feb 2009 19:30:19 -0600, Mitch@_._ wrote:

Sorry, I should have asked it the local glass shop will build the unit in thier local shop. Those are the folk to buy from.
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On 2/9/2009 5:49 PM Oren spake thus:

Do local glass shops actually do that? Building sealed, noble-gas-filled multi-glazed units doesn't exactly sound like a cottage industry.
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On Mon, 09 Feb 2009 18:15:46 -0800, David Nebenzahl

If your local glass shop is doing it they are either VERY large, or supplying crappy product. The good suppliers have pretty complex equipment.
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Most local glass shops are NOT equipped to make the "thermal unit" as they are called. There are relatively few companies that actually make these. Your local window supplier, who would do the installation, generally comes out and measures it and orders it from their supplier. Some have Argon, some don't - and there is "low E" and "Low E squared" glass. When it comes to thermal units there are so-so manufacturers, good manufacturers, and excellent manufacturers.
The excellent ones use a plastic spacer, not aluminum. They use 3 kinds of mastic - one to glue the glass to the spacer, one to seal the endges, and a third to protect the sealed edge, from what I remember from my window company days.
So-So units last up to 5 years. Good units last at least 8 or 10, and the excellent ones are generally good for well over 25 years.
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Hmmm, according to the website, Anderson has a 20-year warranty on glass. So maybe I'll end up paying nothing. We'll see.
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Mitch@_._ wrote:

That would be "Andersen" w/ an "e" not "o" to be pedantic...
I've not read the warranty but I suspect it won't cover breakage that was, presumably, from an outside source, not an inherent failure/defect in the window.
Mostly what they're guaranteeing is the sealed unit and the actual structural integrity. Like the "road hazard" exclusion on tire treadwear or blowout warranty.
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That IS correct. They are guaranteed against losing their seal and getting condensation in them, or going "cloudy". Breakage is not covered. If it is a BIG window, like 35 sq frt or more, your homeowners insurance might cover it - but you WILL pay for it in the long run.
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My unit was bought at HD and made by Silver Line Building Products. There are no conditions to the guarantee, they are covered no matter what happened to the glass.
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On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 13:48:29 -0600, Mitch@_._ wrote:

I'm guessing that is for the glass and gas seal... not for a bird flying into the glass, causing a cracked pane.
Same with flying rocks from a lawn mower. Double check the warranty.
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