"Replacement Windows" versus "New Windows"

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An hour's work and $100 should easily cover it.
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I did one last spring. The old 1970's, single-hung, builder grade, specials. These are a bit more difficult that a standard replacement window where you just take out the movable sashes and put the unit in place.
To to it right on the hard-weather side of the house 2-4 hours if you have alll the materials and tools on site when you start. For sure less than $100 worth of materials exclusive of the window.
In my case the "gottcha" was it could not all be done in one day because there was a little mortar that needed to be tuck-pointed into place. I also wrapped all the exterior wood that I installed. I took quite a few pictures and do plan to write an article on that because I could find very little on the web with pictures to assist me.
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Excellent comments and much appreciated. I have 2 contractors coming tomorrow to give me quotes and I now feel well prepared!!!
Thanks very much again,
Smarty

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On Feb 22, 11:22 pm, snipped-for-privacy@SPAMwowway.com (DT) wrote:

re: Fitting new construction windows will mean removing the exterior trim at least.
The same may hold true for replacement windows.
When I removed the aluminum storms during a window replacement project last fall, it resulted in a gap between the aluminum trim and the exterior stops of almost a 1/2". The trim had been applied when the house was vinyl sided and was installed up against the pre-existing storms. I could have just caulked the gap, but I think it would have been ugly.
I removed the trim, took out the spacers and slid the trim right up against the stops. I don't think I could have afforded the labor required to do this on 12 windows, since cleaning off the old caulk, making new spacers and other tasks easily added an hour or more to each window. However, the finished product looks so much better than a 1/2" of caulk would have.
One other item that I don't think anyone has mentioned is the type of windows currently installed in the 60 YO house. My house is 52 YO and it had pocket windows. There were no sash weights or gaps to insulate. If not for the extra work I did on the exterior of the house, my project would have been as simple as "rip-out old, slip in new" - which is what I expect an installer would have done unless I contracted for, and paid for, the extra work.
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"Smarty" < wrote

Smarty, I'd say it depends on why you are replacing them? If it's for energy efficiency (say the old ones are single pane etc) but that the frames are fine, then replacements will do well as long as the frame 'fits' the new ones. That would be my first check.
Are you planning to do it yourself? Or have a contractor? We had some done by a contractor who did a wonderful job.
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Thanks to all of you for truly excellent advice! I have learned a lot from your replies, and the brochures from Andersen, Marvin, and others really fail to touch on several of these very legitimate issues, especially regarding the compromise in energy / heat loss due to using replacement windows in older construction.
Many thanks again!
Smarty

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