replacement windows

I need new replacement windows for my 1967 brick-sided house. I'm considering Window World and have set up a visit by them. I'm sure there are many experiences with that outfit in this group. I would appreciate any suggestions you have and what to expect. If you have other suggestions than Window World please list those too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No personal or anecdotal experience, just a bias -- based on the way they saturate the local radio airwaves with advertising including silly snipes at competitor pricing and sales tactics using ridiculous analogies, I would stay FAR away from them. Also, quoting one low price for all windows and all conditions means either:
1. They use cheap materials and make money on small/simple windows while losing on bigger/more complicated window installs - UNLIKELY 2. They use reasonable materials and are somehow able to eek out (and accept) a small profit margin despite same low price for all window types and despite high marketing costs - MORE UNLIKELY 3. They use *very* cheap low end windows and shoddy installers and installation practices to be able to get a good profit margin on small/simple windows and still even make money on the larger more complicated ones. - MOST LIKELY.
Basically, if you are loooking for a quality, long-lasting, value-adding solution for your house (which is likely your biggest asset and investment) I would *run* not walk away from companies with business models, pricing, and advertising practices like Window World. I wouldn't let them near my 150 year old house if they offered to install their products for free!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 24 Jul 2009 14:50:26 +0000 (UTC), "badgolferman"

Find a local contractor with good references from people you know who does windows. Find out about the windows they recommend/provide and go with them. You are buying windows, not advertising, so the person who you buy from shouldn't have ads all over everywhere, they shouldn't need the extra business. Look into low-e or low-e squared glass depending on whether you need heat gain in the winter or wish to prevent heat gain in the summer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

www.energystar.gov has good info and maybe performance data. I know if you get most name brand windows installed there is no warranty from day one if the window or door is more than 1/8" out of plumb, level or square. And Ive seen many installers instal without using a level. There is more to this purchase than you realise.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
badgolferman wrote:

I would look into doing it myself and save big bucks. It's not that difficult. Figuring out how to remove the old ones is the hardest. Once you have your opening it's nothing to install, level and foam seal it in. Replace the trim and add outside vinyl trim if necessary. You get better with each window you complete. You can get a good price on vinyl replacements with low E thermopane glass.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I was happy with the price and work done at my house by www.worldofwindowsandsiding.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

re: "I would look into doing it myself and save big bucks. It's not that difficult."
A retired salesperson for the local Norandex-Reynolds store referred me to his old place of employment for my windows. I got a great price, a lot of advice and saved a ton of money by installing them myself.
I did a lot on research, ask some questions in a few forums and am confident I did a better job than many contractors would have done. In fact, when I told the guy at N-R how I adjusted the exterior trim to fit the new windows he said that no contractor in the world would have taken the time it took to that without charging a huge amount of labor.
Where they would have just caulked the gap between the trim and window, I removed the trim, took out some spacers and reinstalled the trim for a tighter fit and a much smaller/neater caulk line.
re: "You get better with each window you complete."
One of the best pieces of advice I got was "Start on the back of the house, with the window that is hardest to see."
That's exactly what I did and it worked out great. The minor differences between the first window and the last are noticeable only to me, but the biggest difference is that I didn't have to stand around scratching my head by the time I was working in full few of my neighbors! I (purposely) spent close to a full day on the first window and was up to 3 a day by the time I moved to front of the house.
The front door is next, which is probably going to mean a new stoop and tile in the foyer. It never ends.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

WW uses subcontracting for installation, which has a multitude of drawbacks, which I won't go into.
If you go with them, Good Luck!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
badgolferman wrote:

Don't forget that this year and at least part of next year you can get a 30% tax break on windows up to $1500, not including installation. But you have to have a rating of 0.3 or less. I wouldn't bet those Window World windows have that. So I look on that as probably some sort of bait and switch tactic.
I went to a local home and garden show yesterday and when I saw the booths that are advertising so heavily on TV I walked right on by without stopping. I have little faith in companies that advertise the way they do.
One thing I thought was a but humorous was that the booth with Anderson windows said that the Anderson windows didn't meet the 0.3 rating, because of the frame. They used the same glass core as others that did.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BillGill wrote:

I'm curious if they were vinyl or wood frame and if the wood framed ones pass?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony wrote:

I believe they were the vinyl clad wood.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
badgolferman, 7/24/2009,10:50:26 AM, wrote:

Thank you all who responded. I have received a quote from a local contractor that seems promising and am considering it. The windows quoted are from BF Rich and are the Horizon model. http://www.bfrich.com/horizon.html
I am told by the contractor they are the ones that will qualify for the federal tax credit. I see on the website there are three different versions of that model and only one qualifies for the tax credit. Other than calling the guy back up and asking him to prove these are the correct type what else can I do?
The quote I got was for 16 custom-made windows with grids which includes two small bathroom windows and one picture window. Lifetime glass breakage, new outside wrap and discarding of old windows is also included. Total price = $5265
--
"I am not a friend to a very energetic government. It is always
oppressive." ~ Thomas Jefferson
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I won't comment on the price, because it varies greatly depending on region/local etc.
Are you getting LowE and gas filled? LowE, I'm a big believer in. Gas filled, well that subject is an ongoing debate.
Another thing to consider is, for the bathrooms, obscured glass, this is always an up charge. Its well worth the small up charge because it provides privacy. Unless, you liked being looked at, or showing off! 8-) Is your picture window large? If so, you may want to consider getting 2 windows mulled on each side, which you would be able to open. Generally for best appearance, you divide the opening in 1/2, then the balance would be divided again in half for each mulled unit 1/4-1/2-1/4 = opening. The picture would be the 1/2.
Of course, you want to actually _look_ at some of the jobs, and talk with the owners. The contractor should have no problem supplying a list of satisfied customers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You need LowE Argon to get the better R values and it does make a difference, winter and summer. Check the spec of the window, specs should be also published . Call the manufacturer, ask them. Glass breakage isnt important but the warranty on fogging is, they range from 1 yr to lifetime with 20-Lifetime being normal.
Honestly you must verify instal and find out now what the leeway in Out of Plumb-Level-Square the manufacturer gives before you have no warranty. Pella-Anderson give 1/8". I learned the hard way, my new Pellas and Andersons, some had no warranty from day one because they were more than 1/8" out of install guidlines. Dont trust the installer, verify quality of install before you pay, you will need your own,- good, levels. This is a long term investment, spend the time to learn it or you could regret it in a few years. www.energystar.com has info, you should understand and compare CDF, Vlt, Shg, air infiltration, U and R values and more to do a comparison, an example , Pellas kinda suck, they easily condense, actualy all my Low E argon Pellas condense, that rots wood. My Andersons dont, Glass is not equal, nor are frames, and most installers are hacks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Jul 2009 05:23:42 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Look for a dealer/installer where the workers are ALL EMPLOYEES - NOT subcontractors. They have better control over the install quality. Sure helps if the forman is also a partner in the business.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.