Replacement battery for drill: pricing idiocy

Page 1 of 2  
A year or two back I bought a Black & Decker 9.6V cordless drill that came with two batteries. I don't recall how much I paid for it. Several months back, when I wanted a new battery for it, I found that for very little more than the price of a battery alone I could buy a whole new drill and battery (but only one battery, not the two that I got originally). A couple of days ago I noticed that Lowes had the drill with *two* batteries for exactly the same price as for a battery alone!
Can anybody explain the logic of this?
Perce
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Marketing better to sell new products than parts for the old. True in almost every industry. I take my batteries back to Batteries Plus and have then rebuilt with a warranty. Costs less than a new battery.
If you really want to go nuts look at the battery terminals and positions. Some companies like Sears change styles and types at the drop of a hat. Making the new batteries incompatible with the old drills.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's why I stopped buying those cheap crappy Crapsman cordless tools. I paid $39.95 on sale for a 14.4 screwgun with two batteries, charger and case. When one battery quickly died I discovered they want $59.95 for a replacement, so I waited for another sale and bought another complete kit for $39.95. It didn't last much longer.
While most companies have pretty much standardized the 12V, 14.4V and 18V tools, Sears wants to sell you a 15.785V tool so you are stuck buying the batteries from them.
No more crappy Crapsman cordless tools for me.
John
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 23:42:47 +0000, John‰]                                                                  wrote:

1) I thought you said you bought a 14.4V tool, above. 2) There is no such thing as a 15.785V battery 3) Because everyone makes a 14.4V tool, doesn't make the batteries in any way interchangeable.

Drop the "cordless" (and even "crappy") in that sentence, and I agree.
--
Keith


Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Cordless tools are going the computer inkjet printer route.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I had that same experience quite a few years ago with a Milwaukee driver/drill. Hadn't even used it that much and the battery went kaput after a few years. It cost me like $70 for a new battery. When this one goes, it will be time for a new/better drill.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote in

My Makita 6095 drill's battery packs(9.6v) still only cost $29 at Harbor Freight or Home Depot.
If you think about it,the batteries are probably the most costly part of the drill,especially for higher voltages that have more cells per pack.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik wrote:

My extension cord cost about $10. I don't use cordless tools.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a drill that I inherited from my father, and he bought it used over 40 years ago. Still takes on any job without problems.
Never have a problem finding a 120v outlet to plug the cord in either. <g>
AMUN
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/12/05 11:35 am Amun tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

I do have a 120V drill as well, but I'd rather carry a cordless drill up a ladder than have scores of feet of extension cord draped all over the place.
Perce
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Standing in a puddle of water with a corded drill can give you a cheap thrill. I certainly wouldn't pay someone by the hour if they showed up on my work site with only corded drills. That's like a guy showing up to do framing with only a handsaw.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

kaput
Harbor
of
pack.
over
thrill.
site
With a corded drill you learn pretty quick not to stand in puddles. ;) And I've seen guys with a handsaw do faster & better work than some people can do with a skillsaw. <g>
The cordless stuff has it's uses, but those batteries are just plain dumb with so many different non-interchangeable types. If the batteries were standard, more of us might grow to like them more.
AMUN
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep there are a few. We have a framing crew in our area that are almost as fast as the air tool crews. And they do a better job. They are never out of work.

When I quit the renovation business the only cordless tool worth a damn was the Makita 9.6 volt drill and I had two. I look at all the cordless stuff now and think of how much money I could have made with these tools. I used to install whirlybirds and I was fast. One hour after arriving at your house I was leaving with my check unless you offered me a beer. <g> With cordless stuff like reciprocating saws, I could have saved an hour a day easy.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/11/05 03:15 pm snipped-for-privacy@the.shoppe tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

But the new inkjet printers that are cheaper than cartridges for the old printer are in fact new models, so they may have refined the manufacturing process and are now able to make them more cheaply. Moreover, the cartridges that come with inkjet printers often have less ink in them than the replacment cartridges (similarly for laser printers and their toner cartridges).
But this is the same drill and the same battery, not a cheaper, flimsier model.
Perce
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@the.shoppe wrote:

King Gillette started it all over a hundred years ago. He sold his safety razor for less than it cost to manufacture, and sometimes even gave them away, but you'd have to buy his blades at a price which seemed unreasonably high for what it took to make them.
http://web.mit.edu/invent/iow/gillette.html
Low end laser printers are another example of that, but you can beat the game by refilling the toner cartridges, which I do routinely for 5 laser printers in our little office. I can get two and sometimes three refills before the drum gives out, for about $5.00 worth of toner.
I refill our HP ink jet fax machine cartridges too, from bulk ink at a cost of about $1.50 per refill.
I probably was born to do that because my dad used to resharpen his Gillette "Blue Blades" by stropping them on the inside of a drinking glass. :-)
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've found that older tools are much better made than the new stuff, which is made as cheap, and with as much flimsy plastic, as possible. My old B&D 7.2v drill used to eat right through cinderblock. My newer B&D 18v drill sometimes slips or gets stuck on wood, probably due to the crummy keyless chuck, which makes it practically impossible to get a good grip on the bit.
Unfortunately, I couldn't find replacement battery packs for the old drill, so it probably went to the donation pile with the rest of my junk. Had I known I could have rebuilt it, I would have kept it.
Anyway, the newer drill is good for use as a screw and bolt driver, and the batteries work in a bunch of other tools, even my weedwacker, so it's not a big deal.
Pagan
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/11/05 06:55 pm Pagan tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

But this is the same drill and the same battery, not a cheaper, flimsier model.
Perce
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can check eBay for spare batteries, look carefully at their feedback to make sure you aren't getting a bum replacement.-Jitney
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

Buying ANYTHING off Ebay,make sure you get insurance and/or registered shipping;USPS lost (misdelivered) a package of SDRAM modules I ordered,they "confirmed delivery" (PRIORITY Express Mail)but don't know WHERE it was delivered to. I don't have it,so it wasn't delivered to MY postal box.
Preferably use UPS,DHL,or Fed-X. At least they record delivery signatures,and make up for their mistakes.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would never buy anything from Harbor Frieght Tools I had a Ryobi 18v cordless set that I ran into the ground. I di however get my money's worth out of it. When it was new I ran th battery down out of the box, charged it up and used it until it wa dead again. This is supposed to increase the life of the battery n matter what size. You should never let your battery overcharge o leave it out in the sunlight. When your done working at the end o the day unplug it. If you have trouble remembering - get a chea timer. 12 bucks for a timer is better than paying for two ne batteries. Also, dont use cordless for mixing anything thick lik morter. And don't use for drilling into brick unless its a cordles hammer drill
When my Ryobi Sh!t the bed I just took it back to Home Dump and the gave me a replacement charger and two new batteries. I it used almos everyday for a year before my batteries started to fail. Unfortunatel I dropped the drill off a 28ft ladder and the casing split. I decide to upgrade to Rigid 18 volt hammerdrill combo. It has rapid chargin and you can charge two at a time. The quality is far better than an cordless I've used and they detach a lot easier. Feel free to respon or correct me anyone
I have yet to use the cordless finish nailer from any manufacturer Has anyone had a chance to? I'd like to know the pros and cons
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.