Removing old grease from garage door opener?

My brother bought a garage door opener lubrication kit. In the instructions it says to remove the old grease but it does not say how to remove it. What is the best way of removing old grease from our garage door opener? We have some engine degreasing aerosol cans. Would they be a good way to go? Thank you in advance for all replies.
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Daniel Prince wrote:

I doubt if it means to clean the old grease, I would think using some paper towels would do the job nicely.
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I'd wipe it down with kerosene
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wrote:

I'd use paper towels. Kerosene is a decent solvent, fairly non-toxic, plus helps prevent rust. Dispose of the paper towels or rags wisely.
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At Home Depot last year, in the cleaning department, I found something called Just A Rag or a name close enough to that to make it easy to spot. Made by Scott, big yellow box. They're VERY tough paper towels which are much less likely to shred than the normal ones. Very handy.
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Paper towels or rags to wipe up 80% of the old grease should work fine. Being compulsive, I'd follow that up with paper towels or rags soaked in some solvent to remove about half of what the first pass didn't get. The extra effort isn't that excessive considering the fact that you are only doing this every 10 years or so.
Use something safe and inexpensive as the solvent. Kerosene (fuel oil) would seem like a very good choice. Brake cleaner works extremely well, but it is both expensive and the fumes are very unhealthy.
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Low VOC mineral spirits is pretty good stuff but, like anything with petroleum in it, not as cheap as it used to be. Diesel and fuel oil will work but it is nasty smelling and messy. I keep a spray bottle with mineral spirits and motor oil (50/50) around for cleaning and preservting tools.
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Around here, kerosene isn't what is commonly meant by fuel oil.

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I always thought that number 1 fuel oil and kerosene where pretty much the same entity.
For the purposes of cleaning, I also assume that kerosene, number 1 fuel oil, number 2 fuel oil, Stoddard solvent and similar items are all equally reasonable choices. All you want/need is low cost, low volatility and good solvent properties.
Ok, I'll confess that I sometimes use ether, gasoline and other nasties for cleaning. Just don't tell the insurance company.
Gideon
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mm wrote in message ...

Around here, kerosene isn't what is commonly meant by fuel oil.

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Get what you can off with rags. Carburetor cleaner is awesome. It stinks big time. Keep the doors open and no open flames or smoking around it!
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