Removing Aerator From Copper Faucet

Hi,
I need to remove a clogged aerator from a copper clad faucet. The aerator has corroded onto the faucet. How do I remove the aerator without damaging it? The faucet is part of an expensive set.
Thanks, Gary
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wrote:

Get a round sheet of rubber with little mountains on it. Maybe 5" in diameter, although I once saw smaller.
I don't know if these are sold. I only see them given away free, with advertising on them.
But try a few dollar stores.
If not, get a small rubber strap wrench.
If you use a piece of towell and pliers, the pliers will scratch the chrome right through the towell. Maybe leather thick enough would not let that happen, but it would have to be thicker than one would think.

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Harbor freight has a set where you get I think 3 strap wrenches of different size for not much, maybe $9 or so. If not, HD or similar has them.
In line with the bumpy rubber thing, I've seen similar sold to remove jar lids. Or he could try a piece of the open rubber mat type of shelf liner for fridges that is sold at Walmart, etc.
I'd spray it with penetrating oil first and leave it over night.

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wrote:

I'd try a penatrant first. Let it soak overnight. I'd wrap the aerator with cloth or rubber for a better grip and minimal damage.
Heat will work, but it would probably discolor the faucet spout.
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I like your idea best but if the OP wants to try the old vinegar trick first, assuming he doesn't have the penetrant yet, it might work. I think vinegar won't hurt copper but he better ask first before he wraps it in a baggy full of vinegar over night. My wife doesn't like me to wipe down our brass door knobs with vinegar because she claims it helps speed up the tarnishing of them... I say hogwash but I stopped doing it to make her happy.
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wrote:

I've tried hogwash, but I think it speeds up the tarnishing.
And the hogs snort at me.
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On 2/10/2012 7:57 AM, Doug wrote:

You need to consider the appearance and possible existence of a coating on the copper clad faucet. If the copper was not clear-coated to prevent tarnishing, the faucet will have a patina of copper oxide (brown) which is not soluble in water. However, copper oxide plus vinegar (dilute acetic acid) will result in a chemical reaction that produces water and copper acetate. Copper acetate is very soluble in water and you will remove the patina exposing the elemental copper below. It is a matter of aesthetics whether you like the patina or prefer the shiny pink copper color (which will re-tarnish over time unless it is clear-coated with some adherent, durable, airtight coating or unless you enjoy periodically polishing your copper fixtures, pots, etc.
The only way that vinegar would speed up the tarnishing of brass or copper is if it removed a protective clear coat. Otherwise, vinegar is one of the cheapest and most effective products you can use to remove tarnish from brass and copper.
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Thanks to all for the responses. I got the aerator off.
"Peter" wrote in message

You need to consider the appearance and possible existence of a coating on the copper clad faucet. If the copper was not clear-coated to prevent tarnishing, the faucet will have a patina of copper oxide (brown) which is not soluble in water. However, copper oxide plus vinegar (dilute acetic acid) will result in a chemical reaction that produces water and copper acetate. Copper acetate is very soluble in water and you will remove the patina exposing the elemental copper below. It is a matter of aesthetics whether you like the patina or prefer the shiny pink copper color (which will re-tarnish over time unless it is clear-coated with some adherent, durable, airtight coating or unless you enjoy periodically polishing your copper fixtures, pots, etc.
The only way that vinegar would speed up the tarnishing of brass or copper is if it removed a protective clear coat. Otherwise, vinegar is one of the cheapest and most effective products you can use to remove tarnish from brass and copper.
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So, tell us, how you got it off?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Thanks to all for the responses. I got the aerator off.
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