Removing 1.5 Acres of Bamboo in Towson, MD

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On 02/06/2012 10:54 AM, Elliott P wrote:

That Bamboo is worth a lot of money. Before you destroy it look on Ebay and see how much it sells for then think of how much you can make. It's like money in the bank. People pay for something you don't want.
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On Tue, 07 Feb 2012 13:24:18 -0600, Mysterious Traveler

Maybe he'll sell it to you, all you gotta do is come and take it all.
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I had a half acre lot down in Ga my parents bought for me as a gift. Some gift! I could mow it down and there were be 6 inch sprouts the next day. The lot was in town but my neighbor had goats on a little hobby farm out in the country. We fenced in my lot and put the goats on it. It took all summer and fall but the goats finally won out. A new job took me out of state so I let my neighbor grow a garden on the lot until I could sell it. Think it would take too many goats for yours.
Jimmie
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"Elliott P" wrote in message
Greetings all. A new property of my family's is covered by a massive stand of running bamboo. The lot is six acres rectangular, where about *one and a half* acres of the total acreage is covered by a very dense stand of running bamboo. It is 350 feet long deep at its longest dimension The plants have been there for decades, as the property was allowed to fall into a state of disrepair. It is our intention to restore the property, inside and out.
Options for removal I've seen generally target small areas. However this is a much bigger problem! My first thought is to hire someone with a bulldozer to come push it all down, and then put it all in a commercial wood chipper. This could get expensive though. What else can we do? What problems does my scenario present? Hiring a panda bear would probably not go over well with the neighborhood.
The property is in Towson, Maryland.
Thank you in advance.
If you're in MD, your 'bamboo' is most likely Japanese Knotweed. It's REAL tough to get rid of!
JAS
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On 2/8/12 1:18 PM, John Simpson wrote:

Both Wikipedia and Sunset's "Western Garden Book" indicate that Japanese knotweed is Persicaria capitata. This is a ground cover that, in my garden, forms a mat about 6 inches thick. Through most (sometimes all) of the year, it has small clusters of pink flowers that resemble the flowers of white clover. For that reason, P. capitata is also called pink clover although it is definitely not a clover at all.
However, Wikipedia also indicates that Japanese knotweed is also Fallopia japonica (aka, Polygonum cuspidatum or Reynoutria japonica). This indeed grows like a bamboo to 10 or more feet high. If this is really what Elliott P has, a grass-specific herbicide will not work because Fallopia japonica is not at all a grass.
All this illustrates the fact that many different, unlike plants often share the same common name. This is why I try to use botanical names when possible. This also illustrates why the plant should be positively identified before any attempt to eradicate it. If a neighbor was correct in reporting that this was cut for feeding pandas at a nearby zoo, however, this must be a bamboo and not F. japonica.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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David and others,
I uploaded several pictures I happen to have of the questionable plants to my Dropbox account. You can see the gallery here: http://www.dropbox.com/gallery/2745459/1/TowsonBamboo?h=d5ab39
I took these before posting this, therefore I don't have any close ups of the leaves really. The first shows a fox I found running in there. The next four are various angles, where you can see how massive these are. There are also some in the snow, and then one showing how a large tree has fallen among the bamboo causing some damage.
I'll take more when time and daylight allows.
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ahh you admit a fox in the area. thus you have a wildlife preserve. and will require federal state local government approval. must catch and relocate all the wildlife. and meet EPA and other requirements. plus post bonds and get inspections to prove the standards were met
why not just leave this island of whatever alone?
what ae you planning on doing with it? planting grass?
thats just more grass to cut:(
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<eye roll number 2 in this thread>
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On 2/9/2012 10:17 PM, Ron wrote: ...

Not sure if tongue-in-cheek or not; w/ Haller, probably not. :(
Next we'll be hearing how the K&T wiring must come out... :)
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well my post was a joke, but one never knows, and using herbicides likely make it worse.
i have some new K&T info but thats for another day........
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On Thu, 9 Feb 2012 06:03:29 -0800 (PST), Elliott P

Your property looks completely overgrown with all kinds of vegetation. To get rid of that bamboo you are going to have to till deep and rake out the roots. I suggest you obtain a dozer, bamboo stumps will pierce tractor tires. You have a lot of work to do over the next few years... you are not going to get rid of that bamboo in one season, probably take five years of constant attention. Consider yourself lucky it's not on a slope. After cutting it to the ground the first thing I'd do is hire someone with a backhoe to dig a trench around the entire perimeter, deep and wide. Once the bamboo is eradicated I suggest seriously considering installing a 2 acre pond. Anyone who plants bamboo, any kind, is an imbecile. http://www.howtogetridofstuff.com/outdoor/how-to-get-rid-of-bamboo / http://www.completebamboo.com/bamboo_removal.html
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On Feb 9, 9:45am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

i guess you missed where the OP said theres utility lines and a septic tank in the bamboo area.
Whats wrong with just leaving it grow?
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wrote:

http://www.howtogetridofstuff.com/outdoor/how-to-get-rid-of-bamboo/http://www.completebamboo.com/bamboo_removal.html - Hide quoted text -

I guess you missed where the OP said there MIGHT BE utility lines and a septic in the bamboo area.
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wrote:

No, you've got a real bamboo there; my guess from the photos is a Phyllostachys. Control methods here: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/324 http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/pubs/midatlantic/bamboos.htm http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74142.html
Watch carefully for spray drift. Desirable plants that get hit with Roundup/Rodeo can be rescued by immediate treatment with muddy water to bind glyphosate.
My first inclination, seeing those photos, would be to consider brush hogging the area and then hand application of glyphosate to the new sprouts. I'm pretty sure that will work, but will require constant vigilance and respray for a couple of years.
And yes, I will consider using carefully chosen chemicals, preferably applied in the most directed manner possible, for control of large weed infestations.
Kay
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I cane "beat" my wife & her grandmother with a chunk of it. You should see granny try to wheel away from me when I get the big stick out. She gets it twice as hard when she tries to make a break for it.
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I said in another group, I'll bet the Amish could do cool things with that.
Greg
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Elliott P wrote:

You could spray it. With Roundup. Or Napalm.
Attack it with a bush-hog, or, if too big, a stump grinder. My local power company hired a crew with what looked like a stump-grinder on the end of a 60' cherry-picker. It turned large trees to sawdust on their right of way.
Put an ad on Craigslist: "Free Bamboo - You cut it you can have it" to cull the herd to a manageable size.
One pass with a bulldozer ought to knock it to the ground. Then treat the area with a herbicide or ground sterilizer.
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If you're still trying to remove bamboo, we might be able to help you out in making a small dent in your acreage. I'd be willing to take 2-3 loads (uhaul size truck). We can be clean about it, would not leave a mess behind. You're local to us so it would not be out of our way. You can shoot me an email if you'd like at snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com If anyone else has problems with their overgrowth of bamboo, please feel free to email me. thanks! (near montgomery county, MD)
On Monday, February 6, 2012 11:54:09 AM UTC-5, Elliott Plack wrote:

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On Monday, February 6, 2012 11:54:09 AM UTC-5, Elliott Plack wrote:

Did you manage to eradicate your bamboo? https://www.facebook.com/runawaybamboomd?ref=hl #!/runawaybamboomd
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Cut it all down and burn, wait for it to regrow and spray with a good weedkiller.
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