Quick basic advice on a dripping gas 40-gal hot-water heater

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

Which old tests weren't valid, specifically? And why?
That they weren't necessarily representative of average driving doesn't mean they were "invalid tests"; it simply means they were of value only as comparative to each other for those circumstances. Assuming you're talking of the previous EPA Standard tests, that's no different than the current tests--only the test conditions have changed, nothing about the administration or control of the test data, etc.
--


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wrote:

Yes, they weren't valid - the numbers they gave were to low - my mileage was always better than the EPA estimates.
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 20:15:51 -0500, "Lou"

Well, they got farther from your experience. They now say your highway mileage is even lower.
--Vic
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Valid in the manner they were tested. A real auto enthusiast knew they were not real life accurate but they were consistent. If Brand A said 25 mpg and brand B was rated at 30 mpg, you knew brand A was a realistic 21 mpg and the other was a realistic 25. The trouble comes from the people that actually believed the numbers and were disappointed when they could not achieve them.
A for getting them changed, it was a lose/win situation. Marketing would lose because they could not brag about the high mileage cars they sold, but the dealer would have to win with fewer complaints about not getting what the sticker said they'd get.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Agreed, like installing a gearbox that suits the test conditions rather than every day use.
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on hot water tanks, in pennsylvania theres no sales tax on a installed tank, but 7% if you take home and install yourself.
$28 on a 400 buck tank. that taken off install price can make doing it yourself not worth the effort.
sales tax has lots of wierd rules
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yup, sure does. Even here in the UK, we have problems fathoming out Value Added Tax (VAT) rules. However, I'm sure you didn't mean to respond to my post! :)
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But the state got their tax from the installer when he bought it to resell to you.

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no when a business buys something for resale theres no sales tax,
in pennsylvania theres no tax on clothes, cold food no tax, hot food taxable......
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Not true. I had a business in PA and when I bought material to install it, I had to pay the tax. I did not have to charge the customer tax on either the merchandise or my labor.
In my other business, I was a reseller and charged the tax I would then file a tax exemption and not pay to my supplier, but I had to collect and forward the tax to the state.
If you look at the tax exemption form, certain items are exempt, such as material used in manufacturing. Office supplies are taxable, as are computers, etc. If sales tax is not due, use tax is. Businesses are audited on a regular basis. As a consumer, you may avoid the tax on mail order buys, but a business will be caught faster than the home consumer.
PA Form 1220 spells out the exemptions. Manufacturing, mining, farming, shipbuilding, and specificaly points out no exemption for property used in contructing, repairing, remodeling.

The differentiantion is not hot or cold, it is ingredient versus prepared foods, be they hot or cold. That cold sandwich is still taxable.
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 20:37:20 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In California, the only thing they don't tax is death and taxes.
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 18:55:22 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Home depot told me there was sales tax on everything except the permit.
They tax the heater at 8.75%, they tax the $400 service at the same rate so just the tax is about $70 USD (assuming a $400 heater + $400 service).
Given the permit is a tax of its own kind, I'm kind'a surprised they don't tax the tax out here.
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wrote in message

to
ago).
Anyone with access to the web can look up how the tests are done. The testing protocols are federally mandated, everyone must use the same test, 10%-15% of the tests are confirmed by the EPA, and the only mileage figures the manufacturers can advertise are the ones coming out of the tests. Vehicles weighing over 8500 pounds (vehicle, all fluids, maximum carrying capacity) are exempt from testing.
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wrote:

It is HEAVILY dependent on driving style. In daily commuting (DC traffic, lots of accelerating/slowing down) I get horrible mileage but I too was getting about 30 MPG over the holidays, driving back and forth to visit my parents (90% highway) same drivetrain as you, '05 Impala, 3.1/auto.
nate
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wrote:

Think you're the Nate from long ago r.a.d. days. As I recall you were a Chrysler fan. What caused you to go to the dark side? (-:
--Vic
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I still post there occasionally, but a lot of the intelligent regulars have left and a lot of idiots and trolls have moved in :( The Impala is a company provided vehicle, I don't have any MoPars at the moment as my old Dart was a complete beater and not worth restoring, and prices of good ones are rising. I do have a Porsche 944 that I bought as a daily beater before I got a job with a company car, and my "real" car is a '55 Studebaker - just as bulletproof as a MoPar, but apparently not as collectible yet, so prices are still reasonable. Of course, it's still somewhat apart after I lost my mind after a simple gasket replacement turned into a drivetrain replacement...
nate
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wrote:

BTW, I found that the Impala never came with a 3.1. It's a 3.4 or 3.8.
--Vic
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Vic Smith wrote:

Duh, brain fart on my part. It is indeed a 3.4, which is a 2.8/3.1 based engine. Same basic engine, but larger displacement.
nate
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wrote:

I was thinking about an Impala as my next used car, but have to check out the 3.4 first. Might go for a Malibu which I can get with a 3.1. In 2005 I rented a Malibu with 2.2 for a Florida trip and got 34mpg highway. Seemed less thirsty in the city than a six, and had plenty of power for me. I was surprised when I checked the oil before the trip, and found it was a 2.2. A lot different than the 2.2 I have in the '90 Corsica. Much quieter and more powerful.
--Vic
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Vic Smith wrote:

I'm not particularly enamored of the Impala to be perfectly honest with you... it's a little underpowered, doesn't handle well, is very loud inside, and has lots of little ergonomic glitches. Plus I've heard the 3800 is the engine to get, not the 3.4. The newer (06-up) cars have a 3.5 as the base engine and at least one of my complaints (awful door handles that eat your fingernails) has been fixed, although I haven't driven one...)
Of course, I may be biased as my previous two daily drivers were a Porsche 944 and a VW GTI 1.8T, so I may be slightly spoiled by good cars...
nate
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