Questions On Natural Gas Appliance Hookups For House

Hello:
Will be purchasing a 25 yr old house that has a natural gas kitchen stove, and also a gas dryer. Have always had all electric appliances before. Won't have a good opportunity to re-check prior to the Closing.
Was wondering:
Should there be a gas shutoff valve of some sort directly at each appliance ?
What type of "hose" or line is commonly used these days to the appliance ? I imagine it must be flexible; right ? Steel flexible sheathed ? What's the best type/brand ?
What else should I, perhaps, be concerned about and asking ?
Much thanks, Bob
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"Should there be a gas shutoff valve of some sort directly at each appliance ?"
There "should be" but I don't know if it's a code requirement or when any code requirement may have been enacted. When I bought my house the only gas appliance that had a shut of valve was the one on the furnace, and even then only because it had been replaced. I have subsequently put valves on the stove and dryer. Water heater will get one when it gets replaced.
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I don't know about code for gas, but it is common to see individual appliance shutoffs located somewhat away from the appliance itself -- ie in the basement on the line leading up through the floor. Often the valve will just be a very small half-turn nut mounted in-line with the pipe (for which you need a wrench to turn), instead of a quality "ball" valve or whatever with a proper handle.
-Kevin
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wrote:

Yes. The shutoff should be located near the appliance. There should be one shutoff for each and every gas appliance.

It does not need to be flexible. Test for leaks. I usually test for leaks at the time of hookup, then again a day later. My gas dryer has a metal flex hose. Shape the hose in gradual smooth curves to help prevent any stress on the hose.

Proper ventilation.

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Whenever I have had something professionally installed, they always have put the shutoff where the line for the appliance heads off the main line in the basement, nowhere near the appliance and when I moved into a new house, they were already that way.
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Robert11 wrote:

I agree with Scott on what he covered and I will suggest that you should check with the installation instructions and local codes for what kind of hook up materials are required. For example some years ago I bought a self cleaning stove. When it was delivered, I was reading the installation instructions and the guys delivering it were trying to sell me a flexible line. I had just read the part that specified that this stove could not be installed with a flexible line due to the high heat generated by the self clean cycle. Even pointing that out to them they argued with me and wanted me to buy the pipe that they were asking three times what I knew it would sell for at the supply house.
In sort, read the book.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Yes, th ere should be a valve just ahead of a union where the pip goes to the appliance.

Check your local codes. I'm not up on the latest, but dryers in some areas must have a hard pipe while a range is usally allowed a flex line.

Learn how to light the pilots if they are not electronic ignition. Learn where the main shutoff is, usually just head of the meter. Gas is very safe if handled and piped properly.
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Yes its code,
The valve must also be approved by AGA for gas application. The valve should have it stamped on it the UL rating and AGA seal.
Ball valves are the best value.
Rich.
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