Questions for the plumbers

While you guys are offering such good advice. I have another one for you.
I have copper pipe through the house. (real OLD house but all the iron was replaced) but unfortunately the service from the street is only 3/4 copper. The riser in the house is 3/4, except in some of the older walls where it's 1/2".
My wife complains when washing/rinsing dishes that the pressure drops too much if simultaneous flushes or washing machine is running when rinsing dishes.
Normal residual pressure on street mains is in the 45-50# PSI range.
Do they sell a homeowner version of a inline jockey pump that would jump the pressure a few pounds when a flow was detected?
As a retired firefighter, I know you can't pump more than what the main can provide. But even a couple of PSI gain might make the wife happy.
And as you guys must know...."If momma is happy, EVERYONE is happy".
thanks again.
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Was a pressure reducing valve installed when it was repiped?
I know it doesn't answer your question, but maybe something to check first.
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FireBrick wrote:

I had a house near the top of a hill years ago with a similar water pressure/flow situation. I ended up installing a booster pump with a diaphragm type storage tank, similar to what you'd use for a shallow well system. AFAIK most shallow well puming equipment should work OK in that application, but I'm not completely certain about that, so check it out yourself.
Anyway, I set the pressure switch to kick the pump on when pressure fell below 60 psi and stop it at about 75 psi.
It helped a lot, but I did measure the pump motor's running current and got ticked off when I realized that I was paying more for the juice to pressurize the water than I was for the water itself. <G>
The city eventually improved their own system and gave us enough water pressure so that I was able to stop using and remove that auxillary booster pump and tank.
HTH,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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How about restricting the flow to the offending other uses? The washing machine will not really notice if it is partly restricted. It may take a couple of extra minutes to wash a load, but who will know. Same with a toilet refilling.
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Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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