Questions about an old nailer... Paslode SK312

I was going to build a 8x4 shed and saw beat to hell old nailer on ebay. Got it, and a half box of nails, for $15. I didn't expect much, but figured that if it worked at all at least I would idea of what it did.
Amazingly, it got me through the entire project; but I have some questions.
It fails to shoot a nail about 5% of the time (though usually is okay when I try again), and about 1% of the time it bounces up and back, shooting a second nail. About 10% of the nails had to be finished off with a hammer; I could reduce that by increasing the air pressure, but then it would drive most too deep. Are these "errors" normal for a nailer, or too high? And if too high, is it because it is an old design, or because it is worn out? (or, dare I say it, operator error?)
And, I know it requires oil, and I don't have an oiler on my compressor. Every 50 nails or so I dropped some oil in. Is that adequate, or is there a better way to do it.
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Well even a bad day with a nail gun is better than a good day hand nailing! I can't tell what's wrong with it from here. Some thoughts: Shouldn't have to finish them with a hammer. We turn up the air for framing, and turn it down for sheathing. Usually have to swat some down with a hammer on the sheathing, so that sounds fairly normal. Some nailguns come with a yoke that prevents overdriving. Misfires shouldn't happen that often. Use name brand nails. Use a little lubricant on the magazine. Might just be a tired gun. Adding oil every 50 shots is excessive and can lead to problems. I lubricate mine once a day--3 drops or so. Double shots are operator error. Just takes some getting used to.
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Toller wrote:

Unless this is operator error, that is way too high. The gun needs a good rebuild. Most real tool places could rebuild it for you, or you could buy a rebuild kit and do it yourself.
Make sure you get a new driver, because it sounds like the driver is more worn out than the O rings.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Almost all framing nailers used professionally are "bounce fired". Hold the trigger down and bounce the nose of the nailer where you want a nail. One nail per bounce, stop when you have driven enough nails in one spot. Precise placement not necessary to join 2x4 material.
Many framing crews omit the necessary lubrication, so a set of new O-rings would help.
The failure to feed is probably the nails. I have the Paslode FS350S; top loading magazine. Here are the suggestions:
1. A new box of 3" brite 31-degree paper-collated nails runs about $20-$25. 2. Always remove the nail strips at the end of the day. The paper collation can be damaged leaving them in compression from the follower spring. 3. Look along the side of a nail strip to see if the paper collation has bulged out. 4. Try loading a single strip at a time. sometimes the second nail strip will not follow the first strip properly, causing failure to feed.

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