PVC water line above ground

I need to run (extend) a water line from a hose bib to the deck and have a few questions. This will be all above ground, visible, 4' down from the original bib, 26' horizontally around the corner and 6' up to the new bib. 1 Is there some code rules I should know, is it permitted at all? The original bib has the antisiphon valve. 2 Is PVC sch 40 OK above ground, will UV crumble it in a few years? 3 I plan to paint it gray to blend with the concrete footing. Will this help with the UV? 4 I plan to use also copper in as short section where many turns are needed, 1/2" copper bends are less bulky than PVC elbows. 5 I plan to come down vertically to a low spot where I place a drain valve and then go up 2% on the two 13 feet sections around the corner and up to the deck. I figure that opening the deck faucet and the drain valve should drain all the pipes including the vertical piece. Hope the vertical piece will dribble dry even if the top is sealed by the bib. Location Austin TX, it freeze every winter, but this is for watering plants so it can be winterized.
Please point out any flaws in this plan, better know now than find out later.
A garden hose is an alternate solution but wife does not like to walk down the deck around the corner to shut off.
Thanks
MG
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Ask your local code enforcement agency. The rules differ *widely* from one place to another.

No
Yes
Yes
I wouldn't do that if I were you; that stuff is too easily damaged.

It'll probably work fine.

Dents in the soft copper tube...

Well, you can buy a valve that fits on the end of the garden hose...
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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wrote:

Thanks, Doug.
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Below the 26th parallel PVC above ground is the norm. Sun will eventually make itt brittle but paint helps that. I still haven't seen it fail unless it gets whacked. Hook this up with a short section of RV hose to the hose bib and it is legally just a hose attachment.
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The quality ones are drinking water safe and 100psi rated
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wrote:

RV hose? Recreational Vehicle? A flex hose that can stand pressure? Thanks MG
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wrote:

Alternate approach: there is a much closer faucet (9') which I use regularly. Instead of a Hose Connection, I could place a TEE before the faucet and run copper, still above ground but protected under the deck. At the end a new faucet and the antisiphon valve, same provision for draining. Is this legal?
MG
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MG wrote:

Use the black pipe that comes in rolls and is used for irrigation systems and as supply pipes. Normally it is buried, but it also works above ground. Use the 90 psi type, or if you really want to be sure of long time use, use the 120 psi type.
I've had a 1" plastic pipe about 90 feet long for my garden lying on the surface connecting between a faucet to an underground pipe for about 15 years the pipe is pressurized from May to October. Just don't keep it full of water when it is freezing.
You could probably just as easily used galvanized pipe, or, if you don't have pipe threading and cutting tools, use copper pipe
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