Please help with a well pump system, no water delivery

I have a house where the water pump would cycle on and off every 5 seconds or so during moderate water use. Today, the water delivery shut down completely. The holding tank and pressure switch is in the crawl space under my house so I checked the voltage on the breaker side of the switch (240vac). I checked the voltage on the pump side of the switch (240Vac). I then proceded to the well opening and verified 240Vac there. So it appears that the pressure switch is sending power to the pump, however, the pump is dead? I don't think it is a dry well... water seemed plentifull before hand and i was never drawing up sediment. Also, I gave ample tie for the well to recover if that was the case. I'm not too familair with water pump/well systems but this seems to be pointing to a bad pump, which is probably 19 years old.
ALso, how do you adjust a pressure switch, I don't see and adjustments on mine?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
First off, thanks for bringing your question over here from HVAC. This is the appropriate news group.
I guess since you're checking voltages that you have a multimeter? With the power off, use your resistance scale and see if there is any reading from the pump side of the switch. If you get no resistance (no Ohms) then your pump is most likely history.
Some pumps have a resetable circuit breaker on them. Look at the outside of the pump and see... it's usually red and looks like a tiny switch. You can try this but the breaker probably tripped because your pump is worn out.
If the pressure switch is giving the pump the volts... don't adjust it. It isn't your problem.
Let us know if you need help checking the resistance.
Jake

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Suggest call in a pro, sounds like your tank is waterlogged and now you have damaged the switch, controller or pump due to repeatedly short cycling the system.
Now, we need to know how many wires actually go down to the pump, and get an ohms reading of the pump windings to know if the pump is for sure dead, just as Jake has suggested.
And getting the pump to run again is only part of the work you have ahead, you still need to get the tank un-waterlogged, if you dont, you will eventually cause more damage to the electricals--you can drain the tank to get air into it once a week or so as a temporary measure, but it is something you definately do need to eventually get fixed properly.
Now some common things are burnt contacts on the pressure switch, a simple voltage reading will still show voltage, but not enough current can be supplied through them to actually start the pump if this is the case.
Many pumps also have a controller box, inside it there is a start relay, this can sometimes go bad--there is also a start capacitor in there, these too can go bad from overheating due to short cycling too.....
Many things to check, a pro will usually have anything needed on his service truck to repair the system quickly, usually with less than one hours labor charge, save for if he finds the pump has burnt up.
Good luck--and if you can describe the system better for us, myself and some of the others can probably eventually walk you through most of this.
--

SVL






Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Agree. Sounds like the system has been 'waterlogged' for quite a while! Many systems have a 'snifter' valve that add air when the pump is running to ensure that a proper 'head' of air pressure is maintained; the poster does not describe their system or mention whether it is has a membrane type pressure tank etc. Get some help; the business of the pump cutting in and out every few seconds could have put as much wear and tear on all parts of the system in three months as normally in five to ten years! It is possible to put out much effort and replace wrong things at considerable cost and achieve nothing! It is most unlikely that the pressure switch needs 'adjustment' although it may, depending on the system, be burnt out by overuse? Once the system is working again would be the time to check the pressure. Overall it might just be something simple. Also it MIGHT be possible to get the system working temporarily by repairing/fixing or bypassing one item, maybe get it working by switching on manually just to get a bit of water but must be done with care to avoid breaking something else. Also it is a 240 volt system so be careful!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.