pellet stove insert questions


I have a non-functioning centrally located fireplace where I'd like to put a small pellet stove insert. I have a few basic questions so I even know what to look for;
1. Are inserts designed with the expectation that the existing firebox and firebrick will be intact? To fit an insert in I'd probably have to remove the existing firebrick because the fireplace is so shallow. Does this become a fire hazard, or are inserts designed to take this into account?
2. typically speaking, what it the longest vertical exhaust run permitted without additional exhaust fans? I live in an old 2-story house with high ceilings, so the exhaust would be vented up through two tall stories then the attic, so it has a way to go.
3. If it is even permitted, do any pellet stoves come with powerfans allowing a downward vent to exhaust down through the basement then out the of the basement wall outside the house? It would be a /lot/ easier (and shorter) than trying to go up.
Thank you for any advice, Keith Central Michigan
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Those are some rather technical questions. It may be best to consult with the maker of the insert or stove. My take: I think it would be a shame to remove brick from an existing fireplace, for whatever reason. You should be able to arrange something which will allow you to avoid it. Perhaps a short horizonatal run of pipe and an elbow would do it.

I do not know what the longest run would be but do not think there is any problem with a two story run of flue. It's commnon enough. I have never heard of any fans used with that type of appliace. You should have your flue cleaned and inspected by a pro before doing this. Old flues can have problems and may not be safe.

Never heard of it and it sounds dangerous. If the flue is in place then it hardly seems easier than using an existing flue.
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I'd check out that fireplace and its chimney before doing anything.
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I've heated with a pellet insert in out kitchen fireplace for 12 seasons now. When you install the insert, you will remove the flue mechanism and replace it with a metal plate, through which a hole has been cut to allow the short length of flex pipe to exhaust your stove. It's not a big deal.
If you can't find a pellet model that will fit your fireplace, you could either put a free-standing stove in front of the fireplace, with the same venting solution, or place the stove near an outside wall and use standard pellet vent. If you use the fireplace and existing chimney, have the chimney cleaned before you install, and after that inspections will be all that's required. If your chimney is extremely tall, ask the store where you buy the stove. My own chimney has inlets in the basement, and it goes up two stories from there, then through the peaked roof, so I'd guess 35 ft.
Keith too.
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