Pella PRoblems

We recently moved into a new house that was built in 1997. The past homeowner supplied Pella Designer Series casement windows to the contractors who presumably did the install.
The great room has 2 3'x5's in the front, and 2 in the back side. The dining room has 2 in the front. The bedrooms all have 2 3'x'5's as well.
Every window in the house has condensation on both the inside glass, as well as the inside of the outside pane of glass. The inside glass is removable, and some of the smaller bathroom windows have a hole on the inside pane with a rubber stopper in them.
Now according to Pellas stated interior humidity recommendations, I'm well below. I'm currently showing an average of 20-24% humidity.
Now, I have yet to clean the baffles in the sashes, but I think that would only explain the condensation on the exterior pane (assuming. no venting is happening between the exterior and interior glass), but I'm still mystified about the interior condensation.
As it stands now, the interior window rubber seals look fine, but the exterior seals where the casement hits the outside frame appear ultra flat, and have ice around from the frozen condensation.
Where's the first place to start? I've read some less than pleasant Pella stories, and given my humidity level indoor, I shouldn't be dealing with condensation. I imagine at this rate, these windows won't last nearly as long as they should.
-=Chris
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Did you calibrate your humidistat, then you have no idea of your true humidity. wrap a moist rag around it put it in a plastic bag for 30 min. it should read 94-96% Pellas do condense at lower levels., than other brands. Other than that your humidity is to high, lower it till they dont condense
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That's not a real solution. I doubt it is over 30%, but I will get confirmation.
Even at 30% , pellas are supposedly condensation free down to 0 degrees. Anything less than 30% starts to dry out hard wood floors (of which the entire first floor is hardwood).
Aside from all that, according to Pella, interior (inside) side condensation is due to internal humidity, but not the internal side of the outside pain. And there certainly should be no water around the outside pane of glass at the top, even if the condensation falls towards the bottom.
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m Ransley wrote:

Actually, I've spent some time looking at various windows around the house. It also seems that on most of them, when I engage the latch, the windows don't get drawn in towards the rubber seal any tigher than it they were just sitting there. Is there an adjustment for these latches?
Time to go find a Pella owners manual.
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Where are you located and how cold is it? I'm outside of Toronto, Ontario and we have seen a real cold snap (-20 highs and well below at night). You will get condensation on most windows at these temps. Having said that, my Pellas, of which I have certain issues with, have not condensed at all (with 30-35% humidity readings). Contact Pella immediately and have them come look at the situation.

well.
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Just some more info. I snagged another themo-hygrometer and it confirms my interior humidity levels. Even more interesting is that I have a pella full-light entry door in the front, and one downstairs in the basemen both without storm doorst: no condensation. The basement also has 2 double hung vinyl windows around the door, which don't have condensation either.
As a test yesterday I turned off the dehumidifier. I then cleaned the weep holes and wiped down the interior surface of the exterior pane, and also the interion surface of the interior pane on two windows. On two others, I simply wiped down the interior pane.
So far, none of them have condensation. IS this just a case of them condensing during a crazy cold day, and not drying out since?
Right now, it's about 23 degrees with 52% humidity outside.
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Are these twin pane windows, or can you remove one of the panes? If they are sealed twin pane, there should never be condensation in the inside of the outside pane .... never. If there is, this is a seal failure and most companies will replace them during the warranty period, usually something like 10 years.
Christopher H. Laco wrote:

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Art Todesco wrote:

THe inner pane is removable (although it feels like 2 panes glued together) with a rubber seal where it meet the wooden frame. There is about 1.5" between the inner and outer panes.
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Chris,
When you see ice or condensate forming on the inside place a straight edge on the window from corner to corner if possible. Look at the glass and see if it is bowed in (leaving a gap under the straight edge.) My guess is that the windows have failed and on days when the barometric pressure is high, along with cold exterior temperatures and some atmospheric moisture inside the house, that moisture will condense on the window because you no longer have much insulation there. In fact it may be that the inner and outer panes of glass are touching in the center of the pane. Frequently when this is the failure ice will form on the surface inside the house in the center of the pane. The ice will form a very symmetrical ellipse.
RB
Christopher H. Laco wrote:

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