Passenger duct taped to seat

A crazed passenger on a plane to NYC tried to open a rear door while in flight and was duct taped to his seat. The stewardess had to call for help, but she got it.
See, duct tape meets all requirements, and they carry it on planes.
I've lost track of whether it is duck tape or duct tape. I know I saw something called duck tape at HD, but what is the generic name.
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wrote:

Duck tape as I know is a knock off of duct tape.
A Federal employee transporting prisons used duct tape to prevent one inmate from spitting on/biting him. The inmate died and the employee became a trustee in a county jail (5 year fed sentence). The Federal Bureau of Prisons requested in writing, that any employees with prior knowledge of the use of DUCT tape report this use.
I prefer DUCT tape over duck tape.
-- Oren
"I didn’t say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you."
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on 8/26/2007 6:35 PM Oren said the following:

Actually, it is the opposite, It was invented in 1942 by Johnson & Johnson for the US military during WWII to keep moisture out of ammunition cases and other waterproofing. It was unnamed other than army tape, but because it was waterproof, it was called Duck tape by the GIs. It got its Duct tape name for its uses in air ducting after the war.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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As general purpose tape (aka 200 mph tape in the race circles), it is great for a lot of things, from taping crazed passengers to their seats to weekends with kinky girlfriends. One thing it is NOT good for is taping ducts. It rots, decomposes, and turns to dust and strings in no time. The foil variety of tape designed specifically to join HVAC runs is superbly superior. I guess it got its name from the inability of some to spell, and the lack of actual experience of others with HVAC equipment.
Now, gaffer's tape! That's a horse of a different cover. I don't know what's in that stuff, but I have a strip on my garage floor three years old that is covering up an extension cord that looks like it was put down yesterday. And it's expensive, too.
(But when it comes off the job, I will settle for nothing but the finest!) ;-)
Steve
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DUCK tape = grey, stringy tape used for general repairs. Originally used for waterproof sealing, hence the "duck" name.
DUCT tape = shiny, metal tape used exclusively for taping seams on ductwork.
They are not interchangable.
Folks mix up the names because they sound so similar and because they simply mimic what they hear without knowing what they are talking about.
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We had what you call DUCK tape A LONG TIME before this shiny foil backed stuff came along. The gray stuff everyone calls DUCK tape is actually the original DUCT tape. And the good brands last just as well as the foil stuff.
steve

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If I am going to crawl around the attic and seal the ducts, I would ten times rather use the foil type as the other. In my area, attic temperatures are very high, and I have not seen any fabric tape that doesn't dry out and deteriorate. May be different in your area.
Steve
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Exactly right
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Bahhhh, I've patched my planes often enough to get home after bird strikes etc.... the civilian pilots call the stuff SPEED TAPE ( tape usually used to cover a hole or a dent on the leading edge of the wing) and military pilots call it GUN TAPE ( too many uses to write) THEN it found it's way into homes..... I just can't figure out exactly when the stuff stopped sticking properly.

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Eventually into the hills of TN, East of Nashville. "Skillet" had a blinker out in the rear tail light. He removed parts of the steering column - really digging for the problem. He gave up and "duct" tapped the parts back together and I suppose they remained that way.
Somebody asked him later, did you check the light bulb?
-- Oren
"I didn’t say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you."
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As a kid on the job sites, we called it 'boo-boo tape'.
aem sends....
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aemeijers wrote:

I don't believe there's any substantiated evidence to corroborate the GI story. From what I've seen, the "duck" wasn't really widespread until much later after it had already been widely used as duct tape. It wasn't until the mid-80s' when a manufacturer renamed/branded their product "Duck Tape" to make the play on the sound a marketing ploy that it became really a widespread perception. I think that firm tries to promote the perception themselves, but don't believe there is any real evidence to support the contention...
Not that it really makes any difference, but... :)
--
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DUCK named after the type of material (the threaded part) the tape is based on. Google "cotton duck" for more info.
I do see some now labelled DUCT tape which looks just like DUCK tape..It may be stickier but I'd never use it on heat DUCT applications, especially in a hot attic or sealed in a wall behind sheetrock. Over time the glue/tape, due to heat, will let go and end up with the same end result as no tape.
It works great on temporary applications as we all know.

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